No. 53

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Journal of the Senate

97th Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2014

Senate Chamber, Lansing, Wednesday, June 4, 2014.

10:00 a.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Brian N. Calley.

The roll was called by the Secretary of the Senate, who announced that a quorum was present.

Ananich—present Hood—present Pappageorge—present

Anderson—present Hopgood—present Pavlov—present

Bieda—present Hune—present Proos—present

Booher—present Hunter—present Richardville—present

Brandenburg—present Jansen—present Robertson—present

Casperson—present Johnson—excused Rocca—present

Caswell—present Jones—present Schuitmaker—present

Colbeck—present Kahn—present Smith—present

Emmons—present Kowall—present Walker—present

Green—present Marleau—present Warren—present

Gregory—present Meekhof—present Whitmer—present

Hansen—present Moolenaar—present Young—present

Hildenbrand—present Nofs—present

Father José Quintana of St. Francis Xavier Church of Grand Rapids offered the following invocation:

We pray for those in public office that our God and Lord may direct their minds and hearts according to God’s will for the true peace and freedom for all. Almighty and everliving God, in whose hands lies every human heart and the rights of all people, look with favor, we pray, on those who govern with authority over us. We pray that through the whole world and the state of Michigan, the prosperity of all people, the assurance of peace, and freedom of religion, that they be made secure.

We ask these things through Christ our Lord. Amen.

The President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, led the members of the Senate in recital of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Motions and Communications

Senators Emmons, Moolenaar and Richardville entered the Senate Chamber.

Senator Hopgood moved that Senator Hood be temporarily excused from today’s session.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Hopgood moved that Senator Johnson be excused from today’s session.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Meekhof moved that rule 2.106 be suspended to allow committees to meet during Senate session.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senator Meekhof moved that rule 3.902 be suspended to allow his guests and the guests of Senator Brandenburg admittance to the Senate floor.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The following communication was received and read:

Office of the Senate Majority Leader

June 4, 2014

I respectfully withdraw the appointment of Senator Glenn Anderson to the conference committee for House Bill 5314 and replace him with Senator Hoon-Yung Hopgood.

Thank you for your prompt consideration of this matter.

Respectfully yours,

Randy Richardville

Senate Majority Leader

The communication was referred to the Secretary for record.

The Secretary announced that the following House bills were received in the Senate and filed on Tuesday, June 3:

House Bill Nos. 4998 5178 5246 5383 5385

The Secretary announced that the following bills were printed and filed on Tuesday, June 3, and are available at the Michigan Legislature website:

Senate Bill Nos. 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970

Messages from the Governor

The following message from the Governor was received and read:

June 2, 2014

Attached is a copy of my Special Message on Aging to the Regular Session of the 97th Michigan Legislature. This message transmitting information on the affairs of state and recommending measures I consider necessary and desirable is presented to the Michigan Senate pursuant to Section 17 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963.

Sincerely,

Rick Snyder

Governor

June 2, 2014

The special message is as follows:

The state’s older adult population is growing rapidly, just as it is in the rest of the country. There are nearly two million Michigan residents age 60 and older, a 20 percent increase over the past 10 years. By 2030, nearly one in four residents will be age 60 and older.

Michigan’s residents are living longer and are enjoying a better quality of life in their later years. The fastest growing segment of Michigan’s population is age 85 and older. As of 2010, there are more than 182,000 residents between the ages of 85 and 95, and more than 1,700 centenarians.

Older adults have varying levels of independence as they age. While many are in good health, others have limited mobility. We must continue to improve our aging services and create opportunities for Michigan’s older adults to live not only a longer life, but a high quality one. To do so, there are four critically important factors worth considering.

The first is living a healthy lifestyle. Nearly 42 percent of older adults are overweight and nearly 30 percent are obese. Eating right, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight are the keys to aging well.

Remaining active and engaged is also important. Older adults in Michigan are rethinking retirement through volunteerism, education and entrepreneurial pursuits. In fact, nearly 25 percent of older adults volunteered last year. We must retain the talents and skills of older adults at the same time we work to create opportunities for younger generations.

We also can’t ignore the importance of financial security. Michigan’s families must take steps early to plan for their future. In addition, we all need to regularly reevaluate and adjust our retirement plans as we age.

Finally, maintaining independence and choice is essential to living well. While the state plays a significant role through our aging network, residents and communities must also do their part. Older adults and our local communities should work together to make Michigan more “age-friendly.”

The simple truth is that Michigan has work to do to prepare for its growing older adult population. The time is now for all of us to work together to make Michigan a place where our residents live well and age well.

Independence for Older Adults

Age doesn’t matter; we all share a common goal of maintaining independence.

Prevention

Maintaining independence starts with maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Each of us can improve our health by eating right and exercising regularly.

Michigan’s Health and Wellness 4 x 4 Plan can be used to achieve a healthy lifestyle. This plan centers on practicing healthy behaviors and monitoring key measures closely tied to chronic disease. Michigan is home to hundreds of great senior centers and local recreation facilities that are leading the way with health and wellness classes. I encourage Michigan’s older adults to find out what is available in their communities and take part in these activities.

All across the state, communities, employers, health care providers and other organizations are working on innovative programs to improve health and wellness. Presbyterian Villages of Michigan (PVM) is doing just that. In urban, suburban and rural communities across the state, PVM is using evidence-based practices to help older adults eat healthier, increase physical activity, reduce their risk of falling and better manage chronic health conditions. Through its Village Victory Cup, an annual daylong competition, it is inspiring older adults to engage in healthy behaviors year-round.

The state will also continue to support health and wellness programs for older adults. In 2013, in partnership with the Legislature, we created the Michigan Health Endowment Fund to improve the health and wellness of our state, with a focus on children and older adults. With a starting fund balance of $100 million, I know the board is committed to finding innovative ways to improve the lives of older adults in Michigan.

Family Caregivers

While many older adults can live independently with little or no help, some need support and services to maintain their independence.

Michigan has more than 1.2 million caregivers who often make great sacrifices to ensure their family and friends get the help they need. These individuals should be commended for their efforts.

Employers can play an important role for family caregivers of older adults, just as they can for families with children. One Michigan employer that should be noted as a great example is Midland’s MidMichigan Health. A four-time winner of AARP’s Best Employers for Workers Over 50, MidMichigan Health offers older adults many workplace benefits. Employees are offered time off and short- and long-term leaves of absence to allow for caregiving. Referral services are available for child care, care for grandchildren and elder care. Employees are offered flex time, compressed work schedules, job sharing, and telecommuting. Full-time employees can also move to part-time work on a permanent or temporary basis.

Today, I challenge the business community to embrace policies that help hard-working Michiganders strike the delicate balance between responsibilities at work and at home.

Commitment to Home and Community-Based Services

Michigan has a legacy of providing quality services through a statewide network of Area Agencies on Aging and nearly 1,200 local service providers.

In my 2014 State of the State address, I called for making Michigan a “no wait state” for services for our older adults. To do this, my proposed budget includes an additional investment of nearly $20 million for Meals on Wheels, in-home services and other programs that help older adults stay in their homes.

This funding will equip our local partners with the resources they need to be more responsive to the needs of older residents. Currently, some individuals wait 180 days or more for critically important services, like Meals on Wheels and other in-home services.

A great example of what these funds can do is seen through the work of UPCAP (Upper Peninsula Commission for Area Progress). This innovative organization goes the extra mile in service delivery for Michigan’s older adults. It provides services in all 15 counties, including partnering with other providers like the Luce-Chippewa-Mackinac Community Action Agency to deliver meals by snowmobile.

I know the Legislature shares my commitment to Michigan’s older adults and I urge them to make Michigan a “no wait state” for home and community-based services. This investment will allow thousands of older adults to live in the setting of their choice.

Dementia

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. The fastest growing age group in Michigan is age 85 and older, and nearly half of those individuals will have some form of dementia. More than 180,000 Michiganders have Alzheimer’s disease. For the month of June, the Pure Michigan “M” will turn purple on state websites to raise awareness and honor those struggling with this disease every day.

The Alzheimer’s Association of Michigan plays an important role in helping families care for individuals who have dementia. Earlier this year it asked the Legislature to support a pilot program called the Michigan Alzheimer’s Care and Support Program. This pilot will help families have a greater understanding of dementia and the supportive programs available in a home-based setting, leading to a higher quality of life for all involved.

I want to thank the Alzheimer’s Association for bringing this program to Michigan’s attention. This is a program that deserves our support.

In addition, a unique state program through the Michigan Historical Museum for individuals with dementia is called “Elder HeART.” This program gives people with dementia a chance to interact with others and explore exhibits from each decade which can help stimulate memories. Today, I am excited to announce the expansion of Elder HeART so more individuals can participate. I encourage other museums to consider adopting this innovative model and increasing opportunities for Michiganders with dementia.

It is important to have programs available for individuals with dementia and their families. It is equally important that we come together to better understand and address dementia in our state. Recently, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University have developed the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center which will foster and enhance innovative research in Alzheimer’s and dementia across the state. I applaud their leadership on this important issue.

Putting People Above Programs

Nursing Homes

While Michigan continues to invest in home and community-based services, quality nursing homes are also an important component of our long-term care system.

Too often, nursing home residents lack the choices that many of us living independently take for granted, like when to sleep or eat. Of Michigan’s more than 400 nursing homes, less than 30 percent have person-centered or culture change programs in place. This needs to change. The adoption of these principles can improve the resident’s and the family’s care experience.

For example, through the adoption of a nationally recognized culture change model, older adults who live at Thornapple Manor in Hastings maintain control over their daily lives according to their personal preferences.

Michigan’s nursing homes are making strides to improve quality, based on national benchmarks, such as reduced hospital readmission rates and increased resident satisfaction. While we have seen improvements, there is more that we can and must do to improve the quality of care for Michigan’s 40,000 plus nursing home residents.

To accelerate our state’s progress, I am directing the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA), Department of Community Health (DCH) and the Office of Services to the Aging (OSA) to develop Michigan-specific quality measures and person-centered performance incentives for nursing homes. Together, this team will work to develop a model similar to Michigan’s Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program where industry can choose to proactively participate, outcomes are improved and we all win.

A Long-Term Plan for Long-Term Care

Accessing long-term care has been challenging for many Michigan residents for decades due to a lack of coordination between state departments. We recognize the need to put people first and are working to better coordinate our aging efforts at the state level.

For example, today individuals with both Medicare and Medicaid coverage have to navigate two completely independent, complicated programs. Through the new MI Health Link program, all services will be integrated into a single health care delivery model. MI Health Link will launch in four areas in 2015 including the Upper Peninsula, eight counties in southwest Michigan, Macomb County, and Wayne County. This important first step will integrate services for more than 100,000 older adults.

Despite this progress, we know there is more work to be done. The Long-Term Care Supports and Services Advisory Commission spent the past year reviewing strategies to revamp Michigan’s long-term care system. Those recommendations focus on a coordinated system that puts people above programs.

I applaud the work of the commission. As a result, I am directing OSA in conjunction with the Good Government Leadership Team to lead an effort to reinvent our long-term care system in partnership with the Department of Human Services, DCH and LARA.

Access to Programs and Services

Michigan has numerous programs that need to be packaged in a way that will be easily accessible. Currently it is challenging for older adults and their families to figure out what aging services are available to them. This is largely due to the fact that there is not one place dedicated to connecting older adults to all available services.

This is not a unique challenge. Historically, Michigan’s veterans did not have easy access to services and support. Michigan has more than 660,000 veterans, almost half of whom are 65 and older. Many of these individuals have not applied for benefits that were earned through their military service. With the creation of the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency, we have begun to increase coordination among all programs for our veterans, including programs for older adults. This will help to ensure our veterans receive the benefits they have earned.

All of our older adults deserve easy access to services too. I am directing the Department of Technology Management and Budget in partnership with OSA, to build a new website for older adults and their families to get connected to Michigan’s aging-related programs and services. This website will be consumer-driven and ultimately lead to a single portal for aging resources in our state by early 2015.

Safety and Security

Adult Protective Services

DHS is charged with protecting Michigan’s vulnerable adults from abuse, neglect and exploitation through its Adult Protective Services (APS) program. APS maintains a 24-hour hotline to take calls of suspected abuse. From 2013-14, APS saw referrals of vulnerable adults increase approximately 31 percent.

Unfortunately, not all of our older adults have been getting the service they need through APS. Many have not received timely assistance, comprehensive follow up or easy entry into this program. This is not acceptable. We will do far better and DHS has already taken steps to ensure that we do.

Where the program fell short to meet the needs of our older adults, action has been and will continue to be taken. This includes review of cases, improved oversight and accountability and, where appropriate, disciplinary action.

Elder Abuse Prevention

Ensuring the safety and security of our older residents is critical to Michigan’s reinvention. Each year thousands of older adults in Michigan fall victim to elder abuse, neglect or exploitation. The costs of these crimes, both financial and emotional, are devastating.

Significant strides have been made in the past few years, most notably, a 10-bill package of elder abuse prevention legislation, improving Michigan’s ability to prevent, detect and investigate elder abuse and strengthening penalties for those convicted of 6 crimes against older adults.

Michigan adults age 65 or older make up about 15 percent of all fraud crime victims in the state. Michigan can and should partner with its financial institutions to ensure older adults are aware of certain terms and conditions of joint accounts before opening the account. Together with the help of the local banks and credit unions, we can prevent unacceptable financial exploitation of our older residents.

Also, Michigan needs additional resources to help integrate elder abuse prevention efforts into state and local service systems. Many communities have already worked hard to train law enforcement officers, health care providers and other professionals to recognize and respond to elder abuse, but we can do more. My proposed budget includes an additional $1 million to address elder abuse.

I urge the Legislature to support this investment to help prevent and reduce crimes against Michigan’s older adults. These much-needed resources will fund a new integrated reporting system, additional training and the formation of the Michigan Elder Abuse Prevention Task Force.

No one organization can stop elder abuse. The state, Michigan’s aging network, the justice system, law enforcement and the financial industry must work together to prevent and reduce elder abuse crimes. June 15 is Elder and Vulnerable Adult Abuse Awareness Day in Michigan. Let’s use this important day as an opportunity to raise awareness and do our part to prevent and report these terrible crimes.

Age-Friendly Michigan

Age-friendly communities are part of a placemaking strategy that capitalizes on local assets and creates good public spaces. When people live, work and play in a walkable place, it results in social, economic and health benefits for themselves and their communities.

Michigan has great programs to help communities be more age-friendly. OSA’s Communities for a Lifetime (CFL) program was developed by the Michigan Commission on Services to the Aging. Through this program, communities review a variety of areas including walkability and access to healthcare and develop an action plan. Twenty-three communities across Michigan have received CFL designation since the program began.

A great example of a city doing wonderful things is Auburn Hills. Auburn Hills received designation as a CFL in April of 2013 by reviewing assets and opportunities for improvement in multiple categories including walkability, safety, transportation, supportive community systems, housing, commerce and enrichment. In addition to receiving their CFL designation, the city also enrolled in AARP’s Age Friendly Communities Network.

Our state departments can do more to help create age-friendly places. Today I charge the Michigan State Housing Authority (MSHDA) to partner with communities to create more age-friendly places by working with OSA and Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) to align the state’s community development programs.

Access to Transportation

Part of making Michigan more age-friendly is the availability of transportation options within our communities and throughout the state. We need to ensure there are reliable, affordable transportation options for older adults.

Michigan has a well-developed network of local transit agencies and authorities. There is some level of transit in all 83 counties, including 58 with countywide service. Michigan’s 78 transit agencies provided 4.4 million rides to older adults last year.

While the majority of Michiganders have access to public transit services, services are not uniform throughout the state. Like many other government services, transit is organized according to local political jurisdictions. Some transit agencies serve a single city or village. Others serve multiple cities and townships but not an entire county and only a handful operate within a multi-county area. Transit trips that require crossing from one jurisdiction to another may be very difficult, and in some cases, impossible.

A great example of an agency that coordinated to make service simpler to use is the Thunder Bay Transportation Authority (TBTA). Prior to 2006, the city of Alpena operated a dial-a-ride bus service, and the Thunder Bay Transportation Corporation provided specialized services to seniors and persons with disabilities in the surrounding county areas. In 2006 the TBTA was formed to better coordinate service and now operates seamless service throughout Alpena, Alcona and Montmorency counties.

Michiganders, including many older adults, need regional mobility and transit providers need to become more regionally focused. This is both an urban and rural issue. While Michigan took an important step with the creation of the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA), Southeast Michigan is not the only region that needs regional transit.

Today I direct the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to partner with our metropolitan planning organizations and regional planning agencies to work on the issue of regional transit mobility. Michigan needs to identify the most significant gaps in regional mobility, especially for the aging population, and eliminate those gaps. A critical first step is to achieve better coordination between transit agencies for more efficient and effective transfers from one transit service to a service in the neighboring county.

Talent

As we continue Michigan’s comeback, we must do a better job of harnessing the talents and skills of our state’s older residents. Michigan’s older adults have vast knowledge and experience – we should look to them to help shape Michigan’s future.

Volunteerism

In 2012, more than 2.2 million Michigan residents volunteered in some capacity, nearly a quarter of whom were older adults. Older volunteers typically dedicate more time than any other age group.

Older adult volunteers help communities in a variety ways, from helping other older adults live independently in their homes to tutoring and mentoring at-risk children.

It’s been demonstrated that young people benefit from interpersonal relationships with persons from a different age group, who can provide guidance, wisdom and support. Likewise, older adults benefit from interaction with young people.

We’ve seen examples all across the country of how older adult volunteers can help children learn and grow. For example, New York City formed the NYC School Success Mentoring Program, which helps chronically absent students stay in school through the use of older adult volunteers. This program helped older adults connect to their community and students gained more than 11,800 days of attendance.

Today I’m charging DHS and OSA with launching a pilot program in select Pathways to Potential schools. This pilot will connect older adults with schools, opportunities to mentor and a space to interact with all generations. I’m proud to announce today that our first pilot will be in a Detroit Public School this fall.

As we expand volunteer opportunities, we can learn from strong local efforts like the Grand Rapids Encore Initiative. This program, with support from the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, has more than 30 local nonprofits that are matched with volunteers age 50 and older. Its work demonstrates that the energy and expertise of older adults is a powerful tool that can help organizations achieve their missions.

Traditionally, Encore participants have engaged with the non-profit and private sectors, but today I am proud to announce a new Encore Executives-in-Residence Program with the State of Michigan. We too have much to learn from the experience of our older adults. This new partnership will engage top-level talent who are on the verge of retirement but have a passion to contribute to the greater good.

With so many great ways to get involved, I encourage residents to visit www.DoSomethingMichigan.com to get connected with local volunteer opportunities.

Older Adult Workforce

Changing perceptions of retirement, increased workplace flexibility and the healthy aging of our older population are all contributing to people working longer. Even with these trends, job creators are finding it challenging to develop and retain talent, and older job seekers are struggling to connect their expertise with employer’s needs.

Talent remains the biggest resource for employers and is a driver of economic growth in the state. We have some of the best and brightest older adults in the country. The retirement of the baby boomer population doesn’t have to lead to a significant loss of talent in our job market.

Job providers with new and innovative programs to attract and retain older workers will reap many positive benefits. Workforce planning is a necessity in today’s competitive, global economy.

One company that is leading the way is Bosch Enterprises, a global engineering firm with a strong presence in Michigan. Recognizing the need to retain their critical engineering talent, workers close to retirement or those simply requiring more flexible work have the option to work as consultants through a Bosch subsidiary. The program averages about 650 participants with 150 on an assignment at any given time. This is a great example of how we can retain the best talent in Michigan. I encourage other companies to adopt similar programs, especially those looking to retain talent in the skilled trades workforce.

There are a broad range of policies that can and must be implemented to attract and retain our most experienced workers. They include options like flex time, job sharing, part-time employment, job rotation, and on-call work. In addition, businesses need to take advantage of older workers’ experience to mentor younger talent.

Today, I’m directing the MEDC and the Workforce Development Agency to work with our private sector partners like Kelly Services and the Michigan Manufacturers Association to educate businesses about the positive benefits of employing mature workers. To support this, I’m also directing the MEDC to enhance the www.MITalent.org website.

It’s clear that for our businesses to thrive we need to not only train new talent, but retain older talent. Leveraging the skills of older adults will help us meet the demands of a 21st century economy.

Health Care Industry Workforce

The aging of Michigan’s population will result in an increased demand on Michigan’s health care system.

Older adults account for a disproportionate share of healthcare services including 34 percent of all prescriptions, 38 percent of all emergency medical responses and 90 percent of all nursing home use. This is why it is critically important that Michigan’s health care system prepare for its aging population now.

However, this is just one piece of a larger health care workforce puzzle. We must facilitate better access to necessary care and medications for all Michiganders, while ensuring providers have adequate education and training to provide services. As part of our efforts to modernize our state’s public health code, we will take steps to ensure that our laws and regulations enable this access.

Entrepreneurs

Our youngest entrepreneurs are often highlighted for their achievement. However, it is not just our youngest innovators that are growing companies and creating jobs. In fact, far from it. Older adults make up the fastest growing age segment of entrepreneurs in the country. In 2012 about 20 percent of all new businesses in the United States were started by entrepreneurs age 50 to 59.

The idea of senior entrepreneurship is not new to Wally Blume of Wayland. Blume worked in the dairy business for two decades, first for the grocery chain Kroger, and later as sales and marketing director for a large dairy in Michigan. In 2000 at age 61, Blume mortgaged his house and leveraged every asset he could, buying out his partners to start a new business. That same year, he launched Denali Flavors, a marketing and licensing company that creates new ice cream and dessert concepts, like “Moose Tracks,” for independent regional dairies nationwide. Now in his 70s, Blume’s company is growing rapidly, with annual sales reaching $100 million.

Today, many older adults are seeking an encore career or considering entrepreneurship. There are a lot of resources available, but the hard part is navigating the system and knowing where to start. It’s time to put all of these resources in one place and market and streamline access to these programs so older adults who are interested in being an entrepreneur can get the information they need.

To accomplish this, I’m directing the MEDC to better coordinate entrepreneurial resources and increase access for older adults. MEDC will be responsible for working more closely with the federal partners and programs from the Small Business Administration, including the Senior Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and the Small Business and Development Centers (SBDC), as well as coordinating efforts with our state and local public and private sector partners.

Reinventing Retirement

Older adults have helped to build the Michigan we know and love today. As the state plans for the future it must make responsible decisions to ensure future generations have the same opportunities as those who came before them.

The way many Michiganders view retirement has changed and will continue to do so in the future. Today’s retirees live longer, are more active, are more connected to their community, and continue to be an important contributor to society.

It’s important for all residents to understand why we made changes to Michigan’s retirement income exemption. Some want Michigan seniors to believe that the reforms we made to that exemption were done to harm them and will cause significant hardship. That is simply not the case.

Since the 1960’s, inequities in the tax system led to people paying different effective tax rates even if they had the same income. A fair solution was to make reforms to the system. The reforms we implemented protect current seniors, who experience no change to their retirement income exemption. The reforms also lowered everyone’s tax rate, and they will gradually transform the existing exemption, which only benefits some seniors, into a senior exemption that benefits all seniors.

Reforming the retirement income exemption and transforming it into a broad based exemption that benefits all seniors created a more simple, fair and efficient tax system and it was the right thing to do. Even after the changes, Michigan’s senior exemption is the 8th most generous in the nation.

I’m proud of Michigan’s seniors and the commitment they have to Michigan’s comeback.

Retirement Planning

Everyone wants to be financially secure in retirement. Planning is the key and there are many decisions Michiganders need to make as they plan for their later years.

Choosing when to retire is an important first step. Decisions made sooner rather than later ensure a greater chance of financial security. For those who still haven’t had these conversations with family or financial professionals, it’s never too late to plan for the future. Every Michigander should have access to the best tools available to do so.

I’ve directed the Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) to create comprehensive financial planning tools and to coordinate with OSA, state financial experts and community leaders to develop a public awareness campaign. It will provide older adults and Michigan families a place to go to get information, better tools and guidance to navigate financial challenges that can derail even the best plans.

Lifelong Learning

There are numerous lifelong learning opportunities all across the state for older adults. Many colleges and universities have senior-specific programs and many of these are even free or low-cost. When older adults commit to lifelong learning it benefits them, their community and the state.

One of the leaders in enrollment for adults age 65 and older is Kellogg Community College in Battle Creek. Both the college and the community should be commended for demonstrating a commitment to lifelong learning.

In addition to traditional education opportunities, we know that today’s learning need not be limited by distance or the four walls of a classroom. Numerous online learning opportunities offer flexible and affordable options and should be considered.

I encourage Michigan’s older adults to reach out to their local educational institution and see what it has to offer.

Travel and Recreation

Travel and recreation play an important role in the lives of older adults. Michigan is home to an abundance of natural beauty just waiting to be enjoyed. The state has the world’s longest freshwater coastline, hundreds of public beaches and hundreds of miles of hiking trails. In addition, Michigan has world-class museums, art galleries, festivals, and events. This is why we welcome between 75 and 85 million leisure travelers each and every year.

Michigan’s older adults are active participants in Michigan’s natural and cultural resources. They provide tremendous volunteer support to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and other organizations that engage in resource management across the state.

In 2013, more than 200,000 Michigan older adults age 65 and older purchased at least one hunting or fishing license and when surveyed, 75 percent reported that they engaged in at least one outdoor recreation activity in the previous year.

Older adult volunteers play a key role in the state’s work with natural resources. The “On-the-Ground” partnership with the Michigan United Conservation Clubs is a good example of this. Volunteers spend an afternoon assisting in wildlife habitat creation on state game areas. Approximately 25 percent of volunteers are older adults.

Older adults are also critical to helping young people get engaged in the outdoors and are among the best recruiters we have to ensure future generations continue Michigan’s strong heritage of hunting and fishing. For example, more than 550 of the state’s 3,200 Hunter Education instructors are age 65 and older. Notably, 42 of them have been volunteers for 40 or more years.

From camping to lighthouse tours, I encourage everyone, especially our older adults to get outside, go new places and check out what’s new in Pure Michigan.

Conclusion

To ensure Michigan is a great place to age well, the state, the private sector, our communities and each Michigander will need to do his or her part.

The state can do its part by supporting those who are most vulnerable and by providing quality services to those who need a helping hand. In addition, the state must partner with the private sector to increase awareness of financial planning resources and opportunities for encore careers.

Michiganders can enrich their own lives by committing to a healthy lifestyle, remaining active and engaged, taking steps to achieve financial security, and maintain independence.

Michigan’s population is aging rapidly. We will miss great opportunities if we don’t support, value and make use of the experience, knowledge and extraordinary talents of our older residents.

Let’s all make a commitment today to plan for the future and continue to make Michigan a place where our residents can live well and age well.

The message was referred to the Secretary for record.

The following messages from the Governor were received and read:

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Michigan Citizen-Community Emergency Response Coordinating Council

Gail A. Novak-Phelps of 2701 Ripple Court, White Lake, Michigan 48383, county of Oakland, succeeding herself, is reappointed for a term expiring December 31, 2017.

Michael B. Bradley of 1554 Saint Joseph Circle, Saint Joseph, Michigan 49085, county of Berrien, succeeding Michael Lovelace, is appointed for a term expiring December 31, 2014.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Corn Marketing Program of Michigan

Matthew M. Holysz of 396 WXY Avenue, Vicksburg, Michigan 49097, county of Kalamazoo, representing District 2 growers, succeeding Carl Barth, is appointed for a term expiring March 5, 2017.

Ned L. Wyse of 11080 Frontier Road, Camden, Michigan 49232, county of Hillsdale, representing District 3 growers, succeeding Mark Kies, is appointed for a term expiring March 5, 2017.

Tom Durand of 1725 Aitken Drive, Croswell, Michigan 48422, county of Sanilac, representing District 7 growers, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring March 5, 2017.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Board of Health and Safety Compliance and Appeals

Kevin Lepak of 7921 Eldora Boulevard, West Bloomfield, Michigan 48324, county of Oakland, representing management in the general industry, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring March 18, 2018.

George R. Van Coppenolle of 2055 Fairfield Road, Adrian, Michigan 49221, county of Lenawee, representing labor in the general industry, succeeding John Reilly, is appointed for a term expiring March 18, 2018.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointment to office:

Michigan Iron Industry Museum Advisory Board

Carol L. Fulsher of 916 High Street, Marquette, Michigan 49588, county of Marquette, representing the city of Marquette, succeeding Pamela R. Christensen, is appointed for a term expiring October 4, 2014.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Chair - Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports

Peaches D. McCahill of 110 Mercer, S.E., Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506, county of Kent, is appointed for a term expiring at the pleasure of the Governor.

Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports

Scott M. Przystas of 12556 Lakeshore Drive, Grand Haven, Michigan 49417, county of Ottawa, succeeding Terrance Thomas, is appointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Johnny A. Scott of 124 Arrowhead Drive, Coldwater, Michigan 49036, county of Branch, succeeding Cinthia Vander Sloot, is appointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Lila B. Lazarus of 5091 Commerce Road, Orchard Lake Village, Michigan 48324, county of Oakland, succeeding herself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Paul J. Barbeau of 2101 Norwood Drive, Midland, Michigan 48640, county of Midland, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

James M. Pivarnik of 923 Huntington Road, East Lansing, Michigan 48823, county of Ingham, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Anuja Rajendra of 1707 Harding Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104, county of Washtenaw, succeeding herself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Thomas L. Minter of 2161 Arundel Place, Okemos, Michigan 48864, county of Ingham, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

Ronald J. Winter of 1028 Stafford Road, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49006, county of Kalamazoo, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2016.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointment to office:

Governor’s Traffic Safety Advisory Commission

David E. Molloy of 41552 Mitchell Street, Novi, Michigan 48337, county of Oakland, representing local government, succeeding David E. Stamm, is appointed for a term expiring May 27, 2017.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointment to office:

Michigan Board of Nursing Home Administrators

Justin M. Moreau of 19280 Edgewater Drive, Hillman, Michigan 49746, county of Montmorency, representing nursing home administrators, succeeding Kathleen Hanert, is appointed for a term expiring June 30, 2016.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Public Safety Communications Interoperability Board

Bryce A. Tracy of 111 Watertower Road, St. Ignace, Michigan 49781, county of Mackinac, representing local emergency first responders, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2018.

Adam L. Carroll of 2772 Bullard Road, Hartland, Michigan 48353, county of Livingston, representing local emergency first responders, succeeding himself, is reappointed for a term expiring April 30, 2018.

Eddie L. Washington of 29838 Stanhurst Drive, Farmington Hills, Michigan 48331, county of Oakland, representing local emergency first responders, succeeding Stacy Alan French, is appointed for a term expiring April 30, 2018.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Michigan Tree Fruit Commission

James E. Nugent of 10266 Revold Road, Suttons Bay, Michigan 49682, county of Leelanau, representing fruit growers in District 1, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2015.

Patrick Goodfellow of 4546 12 Mile Road, N.W., Sparta, Michigan 49345, county of Kent, representing fruit growers in District 2, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2015.

Warren R. Willmeng of 7515 N. Branch Road, Watervliet, Michigan 49098, county of Berrien, representing fruit growers in District 3, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2015.

Mark A. Miezio of 10351 E. Solem Road, Suttons Bay, Michigan 49682, county of Leelanau, representing fruit growers in District 1, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2016.

Michael R. VanAgtmael of 3488 E. Fox Road, Hart, Michigan 49420, county of Oceana, representing fruit growers in District 2, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2016.

James Engelsma, II, of 3520 O’Brien, S.W., Walker, Michigan 49534, county of Kent, representing fruit growers in District 2, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2016.

Richard C. Sayler of 8265 Saylor Road, Williamsburg, Michigan 49690, county of Grand Traverse, representing fruit growers in District 1, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2017.

Steve Thome of 6375 Bristol Avenue, N.W., Comstock Park, Michigan 49321, county of Kent, representing fruit growers in District 2, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2017.

Fred Koenigshof of 4050 Kerlikowske Road, Coloma, Michigan 49038, county of Berrien, representing fruit growers in District 3, is appointed for a term expiring March 1, 2017.

May 30, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointments to office:

Michigan Wildlife Council

Alan N. Taylor of 10934 Algoma Avenue, Rockford, Michigan 49341, county of Kent, representing individuals who have purchased hunting or fishing licenses in this state on a regular basis, at least once during each of the last 3 years, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2016.

James H. Hammill of 235 Soderena Road, Crystal Falls, Michigan 49920, county of Iron, representing individuals who have purchased hunting or fishing licenses in this state on a regular basis, at least once during each of the last 3 years, and a resident of the Upper Peninsula, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2016.

Matthew R. Pedigo of 3854 Cullen Road, Howell, Michigan 48855, county of Livingston, representing individuals who have purchased hunting or fishing licenses in this state on a regular basis, at least once during each of the last 3 years, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2017.

Henry Stancato of 8162 E. Jefferson, Unit 3A, Detroit, Michigan 48214, county of Wayne, representing individuals who have purchased hunting or fishing licenses in this state on a regular basis, at least once during each of the last 3 years, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2017.

Jeffery Poet of 950 S. Cornwell Avenue, Clare, Michigan 48617, county of Clare, representing a local business in this state that is substantially impacted by hunting and fishing, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2017.

Merisa Campbell of 1219 Briley Road, Johannesburg, Michigan 49751, county of Montmorency, representing agricultural producers in this state, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2018.

Carol M. Rose of 18555 Glacier Trail, Hillman, Michigan 49756, county of Montmorency, representing an individual with media or marketing background, who is not an employee of the department, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2018.

Randy Stec of 344 Wireline Road, Caro, Michigan 48723, county of Tuscola, representing rural areas of this state whose economies are substantially impacted by hunting and fishing, is appointed for a term expiring March 31, 2018.

June 3, 2014

I respectfully submit to the Senate the following appointment to office:

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council

Deborah L. Wiese of 500 Woodingham Drive, Apt. 19, East Lansing, Michigan 48823, county of Ingham, representing the Department of Human Services, succeeding Deborah Huntley, is appointed for a term expiring September 30, 2016.

Sincerely,

Rick Snyder

Governor

The appointments were referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

Senator Meekhof asked and was granted unanimous consent to make a statement and moved that the statement be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Meekhof’s statement is as follows:

It is my honor to present to this body the Fitzgerald Award winners. It is my pleasure to recognize some young people who have earned this special honor. The Frank Fitzgerald Public Service Award recognizes talented individuals who have shown extraordinary dedication and a willingness to help others. This award is named after the late Representative Frank Fitzgerald, who was a lawmaker in the 1980s and 1990s. Frank spent 12 years in the Michigan House and was twice elected Speaker pro tempore. His father, John Fitzgerald, served here in the Michigan Senate, and his grandfather served as Michigan’s Governor. In addition to their public service, the winners are honored for their excellence as scholars and volunteers.

Our first recipient is Richard Peake. He graduated from Central Michigan University just a few weeks ago and will return to Central this fall to pursue a master’s degree in information systems. He also worked in the office of CMU President George Ross. Rick has interned in the Michigan Senate and with Michigan Family Forum. He has attended the Student Statesmanship Institute and won the John Quincy Adams Award, the institute’s highest honor. Please join me in congratulating Rick Peake. Joining us today in the east Gallery are Rick’s parents, Mike and Kristin Peake, and other members of the Peake family from Lake Orion.

Our second recipient is Keegan Nixon. Keegan is a very dedicated young man. He has volunteered his time in both the Senate and the House. In the Senate, he was an intern for Senator Darwin Booher, working at the front desk, handling constituent cases, and completing other office duties. Keegan then went to the House Republican Policy Office, where he researched issues and analyzed legislation. Earlier this year, Keegan was a finalist in the Daniel Rosenthal Legislative Intern Award competition. Keegan has also attended the Student Statesmanship Institute on several occasions. Joining us today in the east Gallery are Keegan’s parents, Brian and Michelle Nixon from Howell.

On behalf of the Michigan Senate, we would like to thank these individuals for their hard work and recognize them on winning the 2014 Fitzgerald Public Service Award. Members of the Senate, please join me in congratulating Rick and Keegan.

Messages from the House

Senator Meekhof moved that consideration of the following bills be postponed for today:

House Bill No. 4369

Senate Bill No. 479

The motion prevailed.

Senator Hood entered the Senate Chamber.

Senate Bill No. 265, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 801j (MCL 257.801j), as added by 2012 PA 498.

The House of Representatives has amended the bill as follows:

1. Amend page 3, following line 13, by inserting:

“Enacting section 1. This amendatory act takes effect 90 days after the date it is enacted into law.”.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill as amended, ordered that it be given immediate effect and pursuant to Joint Rule 20, inserted the full title.

Pending the order that, under rule 3.202, the bill be laid over one day,

Senator Meekhof moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on concurring in the amendment made to the bill by the House,

The amendment was concurred in, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 348 Yeas—35

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos

Nays—2

Caswell Young

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

The bill was referred to the Secretary for enrollment printing and presentation to the Governor.

Senate Bill No. 582, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled “The Michigan penal code,” by amending sections 234a and 234b (MCL 750.234a and 750.234b), as amended by 2005 PA 303.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill, ordered that it be given immediate effect and pursuant to Joint Rule 20, inserted the full title.

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

The bill was referred to the Secretary for enrollment printing and presentation to the Governor.

Senate Bill No. 583, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 16m of chapter XVII (MCL 777.16m), as amended by 2012 PA 124.

The House of Representatives has substituted (H-1) the bill.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill as substituted (H-1), ordered that it be given immediate effect and amended the title to read as follows:

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “An act to revise, consolidate, and codify the laws relating to criminal procedure and to define the jurisdiction, powers, and duties of courts, judges, and other officers of the court under the provisions of this act; to provide laws relative to the rights of persons accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the arrest of persons charged with or suspected of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for bail of persons arrested for or accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the examination of persons accused of criminal offenses; to regulate the procedure relative to grand juries, indictments, informations, and proceedings before trial; to provide for trials of persons complained of or indicted for criminal offenses and ordinance violations and to provide for the procedure in those trials; to provide for judgments and sentences of persons convicted of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to establish a sentencing commission and to prescribe its powers and duties; to provide for procedure relating to new trials and appeals in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to provide a uniform system of probation throughout this state and the appointment of probation officers; to prescribe the powers, duties, and compensation of probation officers; to provide penalties for the violation of the duties of probation officers; to provide for procedure governing proceedings to prevent crime and proceedings for the discovery of crime; to provide for fees of officers, witnesses, and others in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to set forth miscellaneous provisions as to criminal procedure in certain cases; to provide penalties for the violation of certain provisions of this act; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with or contravening any of the provisions of this act,” by amending section 16m of chapter XVII (MCL 777.16m), as amended by 2014 PA 5.

Pending the order that, under rule 3.202, the bill be laid over one day,

Senator Meekhof moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on concurring in the substitute made to the bill by the House,

The substitute was concurred in, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 349 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title as amended.

The bill was referred to the Secretary for enrollment printing and presentation to the Governor.

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

General Orders

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, designated Senator Hildenbrand as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, having resumed the Chair, the Committee reported back to the Senate, favorably and without amendment, the following bills:

Senate Bill No. 880, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending section 18223 (MCL 333.18223), as amended by 2010 PA 121.

Senate Bill No. 915, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 257 (MCL 257.257), as amended by 1992 PA 309.

Senate Bill No. 917, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 238 (MCL 257.238).

Senate Bill No. 918, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” (MCL 257.1 to 257.923) by adding section 241.

House Bill No. 5401, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending section 20126 (MCL 324.20126), as amended by 2012 PA 446.

House Bill No. 5402, entitled

A bill to amend 1955 PA 162, entitled “An act to provide for the licensing and inspection of agricultural liming material and to regulate the sale thereof; and to prescribe penalties for the violations of the provisions of this act,” by amending section 2 (MCL 290.532).

The bills were placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 739, entitled

A bill to amend 1986 PA 281, entitled “The local development financing act,” by amending section 5 (MCL 125.2155), as amended by 2010 PA 276.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 740, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 280, entitled “Corridor improvement authority act,” by amending section 8 (MCL 125.2878), as amended by 2012 PA 229.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 4155, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 5e (MCL 28.425e), as added by 2000 PA 381.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 5325, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 1 (MCL 28.421), as amended by 2012 PA 243.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 5328, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 5b (MCL 28.425b), as amended by 2008 PA 406.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 4964, entitled

A bill to amend 1965 PA 314, entitled “Public employee retirement system investment act,” (MCL 38.1132 to 38.1141) by amending the title, as amended by 1988 PA 343, and by adding section 19b.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 882, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled “An act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by repealing section 18j (MCL 247.668j), as added by 2012 PA 506.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 916, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending sections 217, 222, 229, and 233 (MCL 257.217, 257.222, 257.229, and 257.233), section 217 as amended by 2012 PA 498, section 222 as amended by 2004 PA 493, section 229 as amended by 1988 PA 276, and section 233 as amended by 2006 PA 599.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 857, entitled

A bill to amend 1963 PA 17, entitled “An act to relieve certain persons from civil liability when rendering emergency care, when rendering care to persons involved in competitive sports under certain circumstances, or when participating in a mass immunization program approved by the department of public health,” (MCL 691.1501 to 691.1507) by adding section 3.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 947, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending sections 910 and 917 (MCL 339.910 and 339.917), as amended by 1996 PA 151.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 5400, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending sections 8504, 8505, 8513, 11502, 11503, 11504, 11505, 11506, 11542, 20101, 20114e, and 20115 (MCL 324.8504, 324.8505, 324.8513, 324.11502, 324.11503, 324.11504, 324.11505, 324.11506, 324.11542, 324.20101, 324.20114e, and 324.20115), sections 8504 and 11542 as amended by 2004 PA 325, section 8505 as amended by 2006 PA 503, section 8513 as added by 1995 PA 60, section 11502 as amended by 2007 PA 212, sections 11503, 11505, and 11506 as amended by 2014 PA 24, section 11504 as amended by 2013 PA 250, section 20101 as amended by 2013 PA 141, section 20114e as amended by 2012 PA 446, and section 20115 as amended by 1995 PA 117, and by adding sections 3112e, 11551, 11551a, 11552, 11553, and 11554.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 4582, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending section 2404b (MCL 339.2404b), as amended by 2013 PA 169.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 5284, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending sections 2404 and 2405 (MCL 339.2404 and 339.2405), section 2404 as amended by 2010 PA 151 and section 2405 as amended by 2007 PA 157, and by adding section 2404c.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 313, entitled

A bill to amend 1917 PA 167, entitled “Housing law of Michigan,” by amending sections 1, 125, and 126 (MCL 125.401, 125.525, and 125.526), sections 1 and 126 as amended by 2008 PA 408.

Substitute (S-2).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 872, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending section 20101 (MCL 324.20101), as amended by 2013 PA 141, and by adding section 20101c.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

Recess

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 10:45 a.m.

11:48 a.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley.

Recess

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate recess until 1:30 p.m.

The motion prevailed, the time being 11:49 a.m.

The Senate reconvened at the expiration of the recess and was called to order by the President pro tempore, Senator Schuitmaker.

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Introduction and Referral of Bills

House Bill No. 4998, entitled

A bill to establish a pilot project to accelerate entrepreneurship and innovation by establishing entrepreneur-in-residence positions in the strategic fund.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Reforms, Restructuring and Reinventing.

House Bill No. 5178, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending section 73301 (MCL 324.73301), as amended by 2007 PA 174.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

House Bill No. 5246, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 1 of chapter IV (MCL 764.1), as amended by 2004 PA 318.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

House Bill No. 5383, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 6b of chapter V (MCL 765.6b), as amended by 2013 PA 54.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

House Bill No. 5385, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending sections 320a, 625a, 625c, 625d, and 625g (MCL 257.320a, 257.625a, 257.625c, 257.625d, and 257.625g), section 320a as amended by 2012 PA 592, sections 625a and 625g as amended by 2013 PA 23, section 625c as amended by 2008 PA 463, and section 625d as amended by 1994 PA 211, and by adding section 43a.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

Recess

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 1:32 p.m.

1:39 p.m.

The Senate was called to order by the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

General Orders

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen, designated Senator Hildenbrand as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen, having resumed the Chair, the Committee reported back to the Senate, favorably and with amendment, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 858, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” (MCL 333.1101 to 333.25211) by adding sections 7422 and 17744c.

The following is the amendment recommended by the Committee of the Whole:

1. Amend page 1, line 10, by striking out all of enacting section 1.

The Senate agreed to the amendment recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as amended was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with amendments, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 859, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending sections 20919 and 20965 (MCL 333.20919 and 333.20965), section 20919 as amended by 2006 PA 582 and section 20965 as amended by 2000 PA 375.

The following are the amendments recommended by the Committee of the Whole:

1. Amend page 3, line 20, after “(K)” by striking out the balance of the line through “SUBDIVISION,” on line 21 and inserting “AT THE MEDICAL CONTROL AUTHORITY’S DISCRETION,”.

2. Amend page 10, line 13, by striking out all of enacting section 1.

The Senate agreed to the amendments recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as amended was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 860, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending sections 1106, 17745, 17751, 17754, and 17757 (MCL 333.1106, 333.17745, 333.17751, 333.17754, and 333.17757), section 1106 as amended by 2000 PA 58, sections 17745, 17751, and 17757 as amended by 2013 PA 186, and section 17754 as amended by 2013 PA 268, and by adding sections 7421 and 17744b.

Substitute (S-2).

The following is the amendment to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole:

1. Amend page 13, line 27, by striking out all of enacting section 1.

The Senate agreed to the substitute as amended recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Third Reading of Bills

Senator Meekhof moved that the rules be suspended and that the following bills, now on the order of Third Reading of Bills, be placed on their immediate passage:

Senate Bill No. 872

House Bill No. 4582

House Bill No. 5284

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senator Meekhof moved that the following bills be placed at the head of the Third Reading of Bills calendar:

House Bill No. 4582

House Bill No. 5284

Senate Bill No. 924

Senate Bill No. 925

Senate Bill No. 845

Senate Bill No. 931

Senate Bill No. 932

Senate Bill No. 795

Senate Bill No. 796

Senate Bill No. 797

Senate Bill No. 799

Senate Bill No. 800

House Bill No. 5476

Senate Bill No. 872

The motion prevailed.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 4582, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending section 2404b (MCL 339.2404b), as amended by 2013 PA 169.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 350 Yeas—36

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—1

Anderson

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to revise, consolidate, and classify the laws of this state regarding the regulation of certain occupations and to regulate certain persons and activities relative to those occupations; to create a board for each of those occupations; to establish the powers and duties of certain departments and agencies and the boards of each occupation; to provide for the promulgation of rules; to provide for certain fees; to provide for penalties and civil fines; to establish rights, relationships, and remedies of certain persons under certain circumstances; to provide immunity from certain civil liability for certain entities and certain related occupations under certain circumstances; to repeal certain parts of this act on a specific date; and to repeal certain acts and parts of acts,”.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 5284, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending sections 2404 and 2405 (MCL 339.2404 and 339.2405), section 2404 as amended by 2010 PA 151 and section 2405 as amended by 2007 PA 157, and by adding section 2404c.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 351 Yeas—36

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—1

Anderson

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to revise, consolidate, and classify the laws of this state regarding the regulation of certain occupations and to regulate certain persons and activities relative to those occupations; to create a board for each of those occupations; to establish the powers and duties of certain departments and agencies and the boards of each occupation; to provide for the promulgation of rules; to provide for certain fees; to provide for penalties and civil fines; to establish rights, relationships, and remedies of certain persons under certain circumstances; to provide immunity from certain civil liability for certain entities and certain related occupations under certain circumstances; to repeal certain parts of this act on a specific date; and to repeal certain acts and parts of acts,”.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 924, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled “The Michigan penal code,” (MCL 750.1 to 750.568) by adding section 145e.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 352 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Senators Ananich, Booher, Casperson, Green, Hansen, Hunter, Kahn, Marleau, Meekhof, Moolenaar, Nofs, Pappageorge, Proos, Smith, Warren, Whitmer and Young were named co‑sponsors of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 925, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled “The Michigan penal code,” (MCL 750.1 to 750.568) by adding section 145f.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 353 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 845, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 1 of chapter IV (MCL 764.1), as amended by 2004 PA 318.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 354 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Senator Meekhof moved that the following bills be placed at the head of the Third Reading of Bills calendar:

House Bill No. 5476

Senate Bill No. 872

The motion prevailed.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 5476, entitled

A bill to amend 1939 PA 3, entitled “An act to provide for the regulation and control of public and certain private utilities and other services affected with a public interest within this state; to provide for alternative energy suppliers; to provide for licensing; to include municipally owned utilities and other providers of energy under certain provisions of this act; to create a public service commission and to prescribe and define its powers and duties; to abolish the Michigan public utilities commission and to confer the powers and duties vested by law on the public service commission; to provide for the continuance, transfer, and completion of certain matters and proceedings; to abolish automatic adjustment clauses; to prohibit certain rate increases without notice and hearing; to qualify residential energy conservation programs permitted under state law for certain federal exemption; to create a fund; to provide for a restructuring of the manner in which energy is provided in this state; to encourage the utilization of resource recovery facilities; to prohibit certain acts and practices of providers of energy; to allow for the securitization of stranded costs; to reduce rates; to provide for appeals; to provide appropriations; to declare the effect and purpose of this act; to prescribe remedies and penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending section 11 (MCL 460.11), as added by 2008 PA 286.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 355 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 872, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending section 20101 (MCL 324.20101), as amended by 2013 PA 141, and by adding section 20101c.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 356 Yeas—31

Ananich Green Kahn Proos

Bieda Gregory Kowall Richardville

Booher Hansen Marleau Robertson

Brandenburg Hildenbrand Meekhof Rocca

Casperson Hune Moolenaar Schuitmaker

Caswell Hunter Nofs Walker

Colbeck Jansen Pappageorge Whitmer

Emmons Jones Pavlov

Nays—6

Anderson Hopgood Warren Young

Hood Smith

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 931, entitled

A bill to amend 1966 PA 189, entitled “An act to provide procedures for making complaints for, obtaining, executing and returning search warrants; and to repeal certain acts and parts of acts,” by amending sections 1, 3, and 5 (MCL 780.651, 780.653, and 780.655), section 1 as amended by 2009 PA 11, section 3 as amended by 1988 PA 80, and section 5 as amended by 2002 PA 112.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 357 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 932, entitled

A bill to amend 1961 PA 236, entitled “Revised judicature act of 1961,” by amending sections 8512, 8512a, and 8513 (MCL 600.8512, 600.8512a, and 600.8513), section 8512 as amended by 1995 PA 54, section 8512a as added by 1984 PA 278, and section 8513 as amended by 2008 PA 95.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 358 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 795, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending section 41305 (MCL 324.41305), as amended by 2009 PA 52, and by adding section 41310.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 359 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 796, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 13e of chapter XVII (MCL 777.13e), as amended by 2005 PA 81.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 360 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 797, entitled

A bill to amend 1961 PA 236, entitled “Revised judicature act of 1961,” by amending section 4701 (MCL 600.4701), as amended by 2010 PA 363.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 361 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 799, entitled

A bill to amend 1969 PA 306, entitled “Administrative procedures act of 1969,” by amending section 92 (MCL 24.292), as amended by 1996 PA 237.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 362 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 800, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending sections 41309, 47361, and 48738 (MCL 324.41309, 324.47361, and 324.48738), section 41309 as amended by 2009 PA 52, section 47361 as added by 1995 PA 57, and section 48738 as amended by 2003 PA 270.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 363 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Senator Meekhof moved that the rules be suspended and that the following bills, now on the order of Third Reading of Bills, be placed on their immediate passage at the head of the Third Reading of Bills calendar:

Senate Bill No. 313

Senate Bill No. 739

Senate Bill No. 740

House Bill No. 4155

House Bill No. 5325

House Bill No. 5328

Senate Bill No. 880

Senate Bill No. 858

Senate Bill No. 859

Senate Bill No. 860

House Bill No. 4964

Senate Bill No. 882

Senate Bill No. 915

Senate Bill No. 916

Senate Bill No. 917

Senate Bill No. 918

Senate Bill No. 857

Senate Bill No. 947

House Bill No. 5400

House Bill No. 5401

House Bill No. 5402

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 313, entitled

A bill to amend 1917 PA 167, entitled “Housing law of Michigan,” by amending sections 1, 125, and 126 (MCL 125.401, 125.525, and 125.526), sections 1 and 126 as amended by 2008 PA 408.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 364 Yeas—33

Ananich Hansen Kahn Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Kowall Rocca

Booher Hood Marleau Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Meekhof Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Gregory

Nays—3

Anderson Colbeck Moolenaar

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—1

Richardville

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 739, entitled

A bill to amend 1986 PA 281, entitled “The local development financing act,” by amending section 5 (MCL 125.2155), as amended by 2010 PA 276.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 365 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 740, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 280, entitled “Corridor improvement authority act,” by amending section 8 (MCL 125.2878), as amended by 2012 PA 229.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 366 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 4155, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 5e (MCL 28.425e), as added by 2000 PA 381.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 367 Yeas—29

Anderson Green Kahn Pavlov

Bieda Hansen Kowall Proos

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Richardville

Brandenburg Hune Meekhof Robertson

Casperson Hunter Moolenaar Rocca

Caswell Jansen Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones Pappageorge Walker

Emmons

Nays—8

Ananich Hood Smith Whitmer

Gregory Hopgood Warren Young

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 5325, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 1 (MCL 28.421), as amended by 2012 PA 243.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 368 Yeas—29

Anderson Green Kahn Pavlov

Bieda Hansen Kowall Proos

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Richardville

Brandenburg Hune Meekhof Robertson

Casperson Hunter Moolenaar Rocca

Caswell Jansen Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones Pappageorge Walker

Emmons

Nays—8

Ananich Hood Smith Whitmer

Gregory Hopgood Warren Young

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 5328, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 372, entitled “An act to regulate and license the selling, purchasing, possessing, and carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices; to prohibit the buying, selling, or carrying of certain firearms, gas ejecting devices, and electro-muscular disruption devices without a license or other authorization; to provide for the forfeiture of firearms and electro-muscular disruption devices under certain circumstances; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide immunity from civil liability under certain circumstances; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to prohibit certain conduct against individuals who apply for or receive a license to carry a concealed pistol; to make appropriations; to prescribe certain conditions for the appropriations; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act,” by amending section 5b (MCL 28.425b), as amended by 2008 PA 406.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 369 Yeas—29

Anderson Green Kahn Pavlov

Bieda Hansen Kowall Proos

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Richardville

Brandenburg Hune Meekhof Robertson

Casperson Hunter Moolenaar Rocca

Caswell Jansen Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones Pappageorge Walker

Emmons

Nays—8

Ananich Hood Smith Whitmer

Gregory Hopgood Warren Young

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 880, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending section 18223 (MCL 333.18223), as amended by 2010 PA 121.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 370 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 858, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” (MCL 333.1101 to 333.25211) by adding sections 7422 and 17744c.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 371 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 859, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending sections 20919 and 20965 (MCL 333.20919 and 333.20965), section 20919 as amended by 2006 PA 582 and section 20965 as amended by 2000 PA 375.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 372 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 860, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending sections 1106, 17745, 17751, 17754, and 17757 (MCL 333.1106, 333.17745, 333.17751, 333.17754, and 333.17757), section 1106 as amended by 2000 PA 58, sections 17745, 17751, and 17757 as amended by 2013 PA 186, and section 17754 as amended by 2013 PA 268, and by adding sections 7421 and 17744b.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 373 Yeas—37

Ananich Gregory Kahn Richardville

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Caswell Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green

Nays—0

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 4964, entitled

A bill to amend 1965 PA 314, entitled “Public employee retirement system investment act,” (MCL 38.1132 to 38.1141) by amending the title, as amended by 1988 PA 343, and by adding section 19b.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 374 Yeas—22

Ananich Hopgood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Bieda Hune Pavlov Walker

Booher Hunter Proos Warren

Colbeck Jansen Richardville Whitmer

Hildenbrand Kahn Robertson Young

Hood Kowall

Nays—14

Anderson Green Marleau Pappageorge

Casperson Gregory Moolenaar Rocca

Caswell Hansen Nofs Smith

Emmons Jones

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—1

Brandenburg

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to authorize the investment of assets of public employee retirement systems or plans created and established by the state or any political subdivision; to provide for the payment of certain costs and investment expenses; to authorize investment in variable rate interest loans; to define and limit the investments which may be made by an investment fiduciary with the assets of a public employee retirement system; and to prescribe the powers and duties of investment fiduciaries and certain state departments and officers,”.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 882, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled “An act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending section 18j (MCL 247.668j), as added by 2012 PA 506.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

Senator Hood offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 2, line 1, after “September 30,” by striking out “2014” and inserting “2015”.

The amendment was adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 375 Yeas—35

Anderson Hansen Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Booher Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Gregory Kahn Richardville

Nays—1

Caswell

Excused—1

Johnson

Not Voting—1

Ananich

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Senator Hunter moved that Senator Ananich be excused from the balance of today’s session.

The motion prevailed.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 915, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 257 (MCL 257.257), as amended by 1992 PA 309.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 376 Yeas—35

Anderson Gregory Kowall Robertson

Bieda Hansen Marleau Rocca

Booher Hildenbrand Meekhof Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hood Moolenaar Smith

Casperson Hopgood Nofs Walker

Caswell Hune Pappageorge Warren

Colbeck Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Emmons Jones Proos Young

Green Kahn Richardville

Nays—0

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—1

Hunter

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 916, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending sections 217, 222, 229, and 233 (MCL 257.217, 257.222, 257.229, and 257.233), section 217 as amended by 2012 PA 498, section 222 as amended by 2004 PA 493, section 229 as amended by 1988 PA 276, and section 233 as amended by 2006 PA 599.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 377 Yeas—36

Anderson Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—0

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 917, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 238 (MCL 257.238).

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 378 Yeas—36

Anderson Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—0

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 918, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” (MCL 257.1 to 257.923) by adding section 241.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 379 Yeas—36

Anderson Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—0

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 857, entitled

A bill to amend 1963 PA 17, entitled “An act to relieve certain persons from civil liability when rendering emergency care, when rendering care to persons involved in competitive sports under certain circumstances, or when participating in a mass immunization program approved by the department of public health,” (MCL 691.1501 to 691.1507) by adding section 3.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 380 Yeas—36

Anderson Gregory Kahn Richardville

Bieda Hansen Kowall Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Hood Meekhof Schuitmaker

Casperson Hopgood Moolenaar Smith

Caswell Hune Nofs Walker

Colbeck Hunter Pappageorge Warren

Emmons Jansen Pavlov Whitmer

Green Jones Proos Young

Nays—0

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 947, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending sections 901, 910, and 917 (MCL 339.901, 339.910, and 339.917), section 901 as amended by 1981 PA 83 and sections 910 and 917 as amended by 1996 PA 151.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 381 Yeas—28

Booher Hansen Kowall Proos

Brandenburg Hildenbrand Marleau Richardville

Casperson Hune Meekhof Robertson

Caswell Hunter Moolenaar Rocca

Colbeck Jansen Nofs Schuitmaker

Emmons Jones Pappageorge Walker

Green Kahn Pavlov Warren

Nays—7

Anderson Gregory Hopgood Young

Bieda Hood Whitmer

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—1

Smith

In The Chair: Hansen

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Senator Hunter moved that Senator Smith be temporarily excused from the balance of today’s session.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Smith entered the Senate Chamber.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 5400, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled “Natural resources and environmental protection act,” by amending sections 8504, 8505, 8513, 11502, 11503, 11504, 11505, 11506, 11542, 20101, 20114e, and 20115 (MCL 324.8504, 324.8505, 324.8513, 324.11502, 324.11503, 324.11504, 324.11505, 324.11506, 324.11542, 324.20101, 324.20114e, and 324.20115), sections 8504 and 11542 as amended by 2004 PA 325, section 8505 as amended by 2006 PA 503, section 8513 as added by 1995 PA 60, section 11502 as amended by 2007 PA 212, sections 11503, 11505, and 11506 as amended by 2014 PA 24, section 11504 as amended by 2013 PA 250, section 20101 as amended by 2013 PA 141, section 20114e as amended by 2012 PA 446, and section 20115 as amended by 1995 PA 117, and by adding sections 3112e, 11551, 11551a, 11552, 11553, and 11554.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 382 Yeas—25

Booher Hansen Kowall Pavlov

Brandenburg Hildenbrand Marleau Proos

Casperson Hune Meekhof Richardville

Caswell Jansen Moolenaar Robertson

Colbeck Jones Nofs Schuitmaker

Emmons Kahn Pappageorge Walker

Green

Nays—11

Anderson Hood Rocca Whitmer

Bieda Hopgood Smith Young

Gregory Hunter Warren

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to protect the environment and natural resources of the state; to codify, revise, consolidate, and classify laws relating to the environment and natural resources of the state; to regulate the discharge of certain substances into the environment; to regulate the use of certain lands, waters, and other natural resources of the state; to protect the people’s right to hunt and fish; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for certain charges, fees, assessments, and donations; to provide certain appropriations; to prescribe penalties and provide remedies; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,”.

The Senate agreed to the full title.

Senator Meekhof moved to reconsider the vote by which the following bill was passed:

Senate Bill No. 947, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 299, entitled “Occupational code,” by amending sections 901, 910, and 917 (MCL 339.901, 339.910, and 339.917), section 901 as amended by 1981 PA 83 and sections 910 and 917 as amended by 1996 PA 151.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 383 Yeas—27

Booher Hansen Marleau Richardville

Brandenburg Hildenbrand Meekhof Robertson

Casperson Hune Moolenaar Rocca

Caswell Jansen Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones Pappageorge Walker

Emmons Kahn Pavlov Warren

Green Kowall Proos

Nays—9

Anderson Hood Hunter Whitmer

Bieda Hopgood Smith Young

Gregory

Excused—2

Ananich Johnson

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Hansen

Recess

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate recess until 4:00 p.m.

The motion prevailed, the time being 3:01 p.m.

The Senate reconvened at the expiration of the recess and was called to order by the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen.

Recess

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 4:01 p.m.

4:52 p.m.

The Senate was called to order by the Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen.

Committee Reports

The Committee on Judiciary reported

Senate Bill No. 901, entitled

A bill to create the sexual assault kit evidence submission act; to provide for the collection of sexual assault kit evidence; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local government departments and agencies; to establish certain procedures regarding the collection, handling, and disposition of sexual assault kit evidence; and to prohibit the exclusion of sexual assault kit evidence under certain circumstances.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

Senate Bill No. 969, entitled

A bill to amend 1961 PA 236, entitled “Revised judicature act of 1961,” by amending section 3805 (MCL 600.3805).

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

House Bill No. 5445, entitled

A bill to create the sexual assault kit evidence submission act; to provide for the collection of sexual assault kit evidence; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local government departments and agencies; to establish certain procedures regarding the collection, handling, and disposition of sexual assault kit evidence; and to prohibit the exclusion of sexual assault kit evidence under certain circumstances.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

House Bill No. 5591, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled “The Michigan penal code,” by amending section 335a (MCL 750.335a), as amended by 2005 PA 300.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

House Bill No. 5592, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled “The Michigan penal code,” by amending section 167 (MCL 750.167).

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Judiciary submitted the following:

Meeting held on Tuesday, June 3, 2014, at 2:30 p.m., Room 110, Farnum Building

Present: Senators Jones (C), Schuitmaker, Rocca and Bieda

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Joint Committee on Administrative Rules submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, June 4, 2014, at 8:15 a.m., Senate Hearing Room, Ground Floor, Boji Tower

Present: Senators Pappageorge (C), Meekhof and Marleau

Excused: Senators Hunter and Johnson

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Education submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, June 4, 2014, at 12:00 noon, Senate Hearing Room, Ground Floor, Boji Tower

Present: Senators Pavlov (C), Emmons, Colbeck, Hopgood and Young

Scheduled Meetings

Appropriations -

Subcommittee -

K-12, School Aid, Education and House School Aid Appropriations Subcommittee - Thursday, June 5, 9:00 a.m., House Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

Banking and Financial Institutions - Thursday, June 5, 1:30 p.m., Room 100, Farnum Building (373-5314)

Conference Committees -

Agriculture and Rural Development (SB 760) - Thursday, June 5, 8:30 a.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

Corrections (SB 764) - Thursday, June 5, 3:00 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373‑2768)

Environmental Quality (SB 766) - Thursday, June 5, 2:15 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

General Government (SB 767) - Thursday, June 5, 4:00 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768) (CANCELED)

Higher Education (SB 768) - Thursday, June 5, 9:30 a.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

Judiciary (SB 771) - Thursday, June 5, 3:15 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373‑2768)

Military and Veterans Affairs (SB 773) - Thursday, June 5, 8:45 a.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

Natural Resources (SB 774) - Thursday, June 5, 2:00 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

State Police (SB 776) - Thursday, June 5, 9:00 a.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373‑2768)

Transportation (SB 777) - Thursday, June 5, 3:30 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (373-2768)

Michigan Law Revision Commission - Monday, June 23, 9:00 a.m., Senate Hearing Room, Ground Floor, Boji Tower (373-0212)

Natural Resources, Environment and Great Lakes - Thursday, June 5, 8:30 a.m., Room 210, Farnum Building (373-5312)

Regulatory Reform - Thursday, June 5, 1:00 p.m., Room 210, Farnum Building (373-5307)

Senator Meekhof moved that the Senate adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 4:53 p.m.

The Assistant President pro tempore, Senator Hansen, declared the Senate adjourned until Thursday, June 5, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.

CAROL MOREY VIVENTI

Secretary of the Senate

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