No. 4

STATE OF MICHIGAN

 

JOURNAL

OF THE

House of Representatives

 

102nd Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2023

 

 

 

 

House Chamber, Lansing, Wednesday, January 18, 2023.

 

1:30 p.m.

 

The House was called to order by the Speaker.

 

The roll was called by the Clerk of the House of Representatives, who announced that a quorum was present.

 

Aiyash用resent Dievendorf用resent Markkanen用resent Schriver用resent

Alexander用resent Edwards用resent Martin用resent Schuette用resent

Andrews用resent Farhat用resent Martus用resent Scott用resent

Aragona用resent Filler用resent McFall用resent Shannon用resent

Arbit用resent Fink用resent McKinney用resent Skaggs用resent

Beeler用resent Fitzgerald用resent Meerman用resent Slagh用resent

BeGole用resent Fox用resent Mentzer用resent Smit用resent

Beson用resent Friske用resent Miller用resent Snyder用resent

Bezotte用resent Glanville用resent Morgan用resent St. Germaine用resent

Bierlein用resent Grant用resent Morse用resent Steckloff用resent

Bollin用resent Green, P.用resent Mueller用resent Steele用resent

Borton用resent Greene, J.用resent Neeley用resent Stone用resent

Brabec用resent Haadsma用resent Neyer用resent Tate用resent

Breen用resent Hall用resent O誰eal用resent Thompson用resent

Brixie用resent Harris用resent Outman用resent Tisdel用resent

Bruck容xcused Hill用resent Paiz用resent Tsernoglou用resent

Byrnes用resent Hoadley用resent Paquette用resent VanderWall用resent

Carra用resent Hood用resent Pohutsky用resent VanWoerkom用resent

Carter, B.用resent Hope用resent Posthumus用resent Wegela用resent

Carter, T.用resent Hoskins用resent Prestin用resent Weiss用resent

Cavitt用resent Johnsen用resent Price用resent Wendzel用resent

Churches用resent Koleszar用resent Puri用resent Whitsett用resent

Coffia用resent Kuhn用resent Rheingans用resent Wilson用resent

Coleman用resent Kunse用resent Rigas用resent Witwer用resent

Conlin用resent Liberati用resent Rogers用resent Wozniak用resent

DeBoer用resent Lightner用resent Roth用resent Young用resent

DeBoyer用resent MacDonell用resent Schmaltz用resent Zorn用resent

DeSana用resent Maddock用resent

 

e/d/s = entered during session

Rep. Steve Carra, from the 36th District, offered the following invocation:

 

泥ear Heavenly Father, it is a privilege and an honor that we gather here in this chamber for the purpose of protecting the rights You have endowed upon us. May You guide and direct us through the many challenges we face every day in our roles as elected officials. May You show us the way to better ourselves as servants to You, and not institutions. May Your everlasting love and knowledge reach all so we can have a republic that fights for freedom and Your truth. May we ensure to the best of our ability that the blessings of liberty and justice remain for all, no matter how small. In Jesus name we pray. Amen.

 

 

______

 

 

The Speaker called the Speaker Pro Tempore to the Chair.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Posthumus moved that Rep. Bruck be excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Motions and Resolutions

 

 

Reps. Brenda Carter, Arbit, Fitzgerald, Glanville, Haadsma, Hope, Liberati, Morse, Price, Rogers, Snyder, Tsernoglou, Wegela and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 12.

A resolution to declare January 17, 2023, as Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, Day in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., is a private, not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to provide assistance and support through established programs in local communities throughout the world. The organization is a sisterhood of predominantly black, college-educated women; and

Whereas, On January 13, 1913, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., was founded at Howard University in the District of Columbia by: Osceola Macarthy Adams, Marguerite Young Alexander, Winona Cargile Alexander, Ethel Cuff Black, Bertha Pitts Campbell, Zephyr Chisom Carter, Edna Brown Coleman, Jessie McGuire Dent, Frederica Chase Dodd, Myra Davis Hemmings, Olive Jones, Jimmie Bugg Middleton, Pauline Oberdorfer Minor, Vashti Turley Murphy, Naomi Sewell Toms, Ethel Carr Watson, Wertie Blackwell Weaver, Madree Penn White, and Edith Motte Young; and

Whereas, In March 1913, the founders of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., participated in the Women痴 Suffrage March in the District of Columbia, the sorority痴 first public act; and

Whereas, Since its founding, more than 350,000 women have joined the organization. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., has twenty seven chapters in Michigan: Pontiac Alumnae, Zeta Rho, Theta Theta, Tau Psi, Tau, Southfield Alumnae, Saginaw Alumnae, Rho Mu, Omicron Zeta, NU, Muskegon Heights Alumnae, Mu Phi, Midland Alumnae, Lansing Alumnae, Lambda Pi, Kalamazoo Alumnae, Inkster Alumnae, Grand Rapids Alumnae, Flint Alumnae, Epsilon Epsilon, Detroit Alumnae, Delta Upsilon, Delta Psi, Delta Beta, Benton Harbor-St. Joe Alumnae, Battle Creek Alumnae, and Ann Arbor Alumnae. There are more than 1,000 chapters located in the United States, England, Japan, Germany, the Virgin Islands, Bermuda, the Bahamas, and South Korea; and

Whereas, On January 13, 2021, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., celebrated 108 years of thoughtful service to and conscientious leadership in communities throughout the United States and the world in diverse fields relating to public service and the organization痴 five-point programmatic thrust: economic development, educational development, international awareness and involvement, physical and mental health, and political awareness and involvement; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare January 17, 2023, as Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, Day in the state of Michigan. We recognize the members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., for their outstanding service to the citizens of our state, our nation, and the international community, and for their promotion of sisterhood, scholarship, and service.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reps. MacDonell, Arbit, BeGole, Bezotte, Bierlein, Fitzgerald, Glanville, Haadsma, Hope, Liberati, McFall, Morse, Price, Rogers, Snyder, Stone, Tsernoglou, Wegela and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 13.

A resolution to declare January 2023 as Local School Board Recognition Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Michigan is home to more than 600 boards of education that work hard to enrich the lives of Michigan痴 students through education and directly influence instruction in Michigan痴 public schools; and

Whereas, Article VIII, Section 2, of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 states that providing for the education of Michigan痴 children is a fundamental duty of state government; and

Whereas, Our state痴 public education system is designed to meet the educational needs of all children and to empower them to become competent, productive contributors to society and an everchanging world; and

Whereas, Members of local school boards are dedicated to children, learning, and community and devote many hours of service to elementary and secondary public education as they continually strive for improvement, excellence, and progress in education; and

Whereas, Local school boards recognize that all children can be successful learners, especially when education is tailored to the individual needs of the child; and

Whereas, Local school board members are exceptional people who have committed themselves to this duty by governing school districts and advancing student achievement in the schools and communities in which they serve; and

Whereas, During this month, we join the Michigan Association of School Boards, Michigan Department of Education, and local school districts and community organizations to recognize and raise awareness of the countless efforts and contributions of local school boards and school board members throughout Michigan; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare January 2023 as Local School Board Recognition Month in the state of Michigan. We urge all citizens to observe this momentous occasion.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Reps. Farhat, Arbit, Bezotte, Bierlein, Fitzgerald, Glanville, Haadsma, Hope, Liberati, Morse, Price, Rogers, Schuette, Snyder, Stone, Tsernoglou and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 14.

A resolution to commemorate January 2023 as the 94th anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Whereas, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., sparks inspiration, strength, and determination. He was born on January 15, 1929, but the icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1955 when he first caught the national eye while boycotting a transportation company in Birmingham, Alabama; and

Whereas, Dr. King痴 life was prematurely ended, but is still profoundly impactful. Although his time as an activist was cut short, he managed to spearhead the 1964 Civil Rights Movement ending public segregation on the basis of race, gender, or religion; and

Whereas, His advocacy and determination helped secure the right to vote for African Americans in 1965. MLK痴 nonviolent approach taught the public humanity and the lessons set the standard for how minority populations deserve to be treated. His timeless teachings apply not only to the treatment of the black population, but to any group who has suffered injustice at the hands of the majority; and

Whereas, MLK serves as champion for the marginalized and preached to the privileged. He helped foster an understanding between the disenfranchised and the powerful. Honoring his legacy acts as a reminder to the injustice our American brothers and sisters endured; and

Whereas, Racism and injustice has not been eradicated since Dr. King痴 untimely passing. In 鏑etter from Birmingham Jail he wrote 鏑ukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection. It is the responsibility of this body to embrace diversity and condemn injustice; and

Whereas, Dr. King planted the seed of equality. While it has bloomed over the years, it is our responsibility to nurture it and ensure it thrives. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., has set the example for us, but it is up to us as a society to apply his inclusive ideology and accept each other for who we are. We all know he had a dream. Michiganders are encouraged to fulfill that dream and continue down the path of equality and justice; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body commemorate January 2023 as the 94th anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reps. Edwards, Arbit, BeGole, Fitzgerald, Glanville, Haadsma, Hope, Liberati, Morse, Price, Snyder, Tsernoglou, Wegela and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 15.

A resolution to declare January 15, 2023, as Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Founders Day in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated was founded on the campus of Howard University on January 15, 1908, by nine junior and senior students, under the leadership of Ethel Hedgeman Lyle and Lavinia Norman, Margaret Flagg, Lucy Slowe, Marie Woolfolk, Beulah Burke, Lillie Burke, Anna Easter Brown, and Marjorie Hill, who, collectively, sought to form an association of women students through which their talents and strengths would be organized for the mutual benefit of all. This group later expanded to include seven sophomores (Joanna Berry, Norma Boyd, Ethel Jones, Sara Merriweather, Alice Murray, Carrie Snowden, and Harriet Terry) who were asked to join to ensure the continuity of the sorority; and

Whereas, This year marks the 115th anniversary of its founding, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, has its place in history as the world痴 first and oldest Greek-letter organization established by African-American college-educated women; and

Whereas, Throughout its history, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, has led conversations, advocacy, and actions to address needs in African-American communities related to education inequities, disparate health care, civil rights, economic empowerment, job training, and numerous social justice issues; and

Whereas, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, has over 325,000 members and more than 1,000 chapters located throughout the United States, West Africa, the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands, Japan, Korea, and Germany. Over 30 of these chapters are in communities and on college and university campuses in the great state of Michigan; and

Whereas, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, members in the state have made numerous contributions to the educational, civic, and well-being of Michigan痴 citizens and communities through its work on issues including economic development, community development, at-risk youth, homelessness, domestic violence, breast cancer awareness, education, personal money management, and entrepreneurship; and

Whereas, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, members in the state can count among their achievement痴 successful collaborations with organizations such as the Salvation Army, Boys and Girls Clubs, rescue missions, American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Meals on Wheels, numerous food banks, and shelters; now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the members of this legislative body declare January 15, 2023, as Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Founders Day in the state of Michigan; and be it further;

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the national headquarters for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, and its Great Lakes Regional Director痴 office.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Reps. Hill, Arbit, Bezotte, Fitzgerald, Glanville, Hope, Liberati, Morse, Price, Rogers, Schuette, Stone, Tsernoglou and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 16.

A resolution to declare January 2023 as Finnish-American Heritage Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, On Midsummer痴 Eve 1865, some 30 Finns and S疥i landed on the shores of the Portage Canal in Hancock, Michigan, and began work in the copper mines the next day; and

Whereas, Their immigration formed a unique Finnish-American culture that reflects their roots and their continued ties to Finns worldwide and across Michigan; and

Whereas, Finnish American cuisine, from mojakka, a traditional stew, to leip臻uusto or 都queaky cheese, and sweet baked goods are still an important part of their rich culture; and

Whereas, The Finnish love for saunas has gone unchanged and saunas remain the place to go during the blistering cold winters of the Upper Peninsula; and

Whereas, Their pride in that ancestry is evident in a variety of ways from bilingual street signs to Finnish flags on cars and light poles to the sounds of the Finnish language being spoken each day in local restaurants and coffee shops; and

Whereas, Finns strong work ethic in the mines made Michigan the world痴 largest provider of copper for decades; and

Whereas, The 1913 strike, during which many Finns fought for their rights as workers, was a momentous event in United States and Michigan labor history; and

Whereas, Michigan痴 Copper Country is recognized as the focal point of Finnish immigration to the United States; and

Whereas, Michigan is home to the nation痴 highest density of Finnish-Americans and more than 30 percent of the Copper Country痴 residents can claim Finnish ancestry; and

Whereas, Michigan痴 Copper Country remains a pivotal center of Finnish-American culture and is host to the most significant Finnish ethnic enclave outside of Finland; and

Whereas, Suomi College, now Finlandia University, in Hancock, Michigan, is the only institution of higher education founded by Finns in the United States; and

Whereas, Michigan boasts the Finnish American Historical Archives and it is the largest archival collection of Finnish American materials in the world; and

Whereas, Hancock痴, city council created the Finnish Theme Committee, tasked with preserving Finnish heritage for community development purposes; and

Whereas, The City of Hancock痴 Finnish Theme Committee created Heikinp臺v, an annual mid-winter celebration of Finnish ethnic identity and culture that draws attendance throughout the Midwest; and

Whereas, Heikinp臺v is celebrated to commemorate St. Henrik, the patron saint of Finland, and to mark the midpoint of the winter season; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare January 2023 as Finnish-American Heritage Month in the state of Michigan; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the city of Hancock and Finlandia University.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

 

Rep. Aiyash moved that consideration of the resolution be postponed for the day.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Rep. Aiyash moved that Rule 71 be suspended and the resolution be considered at this time.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members present voting therefor.

 

Reps. McKinney, Arbit, BeGole, Fitzgerald, Haadsma, Hope, McFall, Morse, Price, Snyder, Tsernoglou and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 17.

A resolution to declare January 9, 2023, as Phi Beta Sigma Day in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., was founded at Howard University on January 9, 1914, by the Honorable Brother A. Langston Taylor, Honorable Brother Leonard F. Morse, and Honorable Brother Charles I. Brown, who wanted to organize a Greek letter fraternity that would truly exemplify the ideals of brotherhood, scholarship, and service; and

Whereas, For 109 years Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., has been a leading proactive community service organization; and

Whereas, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc., having nine alumni chapters and fourteen collegiate chapters at universities throughout Michigan, is committed to the motto of Culture For Service, Service for Humanity; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That that the members of this legislative body declare January 9, 2023, as Phi Beta Sigma Day in the state of Michigan. We support Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., as they continue to work with residents, academic institutions, businesses, and government across this Great State; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be delivered to Carl Williams, State Director of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. in the state of Michigan on behalf of the International President of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., and the other chapters based in Michigan.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Rep. Aiyash moved that Rule 71 be suspended and the resolution be considered at this time.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members present voting therefor.

 

Reps. McKinney, Arbit, Fitzgerald, Haadsma, Hope, McFall, Morse, Price, Rogers, Snyder, Tsernoglou and Weiss offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 18.

A resolution to honor the one hundred and third anniversary of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, and declare January 16, 2023, as Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, Founders Day in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, was founded on January 16, 1920, on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. on the founding principles of Scholarship, Service, Sisterhood and Finer Womanhood; and

Whereas, The founders of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, believed in the need for a new and different type of Greek-letter organization and acted upon that need. To these women, Zeta was more than an organization. It was a movement, a belief system that reflected, at its core, the desire to provide true Service, to embrace Scholarship, to set a standard for Sisterly Love and to define the noble concept of Finer Womanhood. This belief has sustained and encouraged Zetas around the world to hold fast to the ideals initiated and developed by its earliest members; and

Whereas, The five founders of Zeta, Arizona Cleaver Stemons, Pearl Anna Neal, Myrtle Tyler Faithful, Viola Tyler Goings, and Fannie Pettie Watts were strong, principled coeds who possessed a great deal of modesty, strength of character and pride in academic achievement. The Founders, the Five Pearls, are indeed a worthy foundation upon which to base the illustrious Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.; and

Whereas, These five coeds envisioned a sorority which would directly affect positive change, chart a course of action for the 1920s and beyond, raise the community痴 consciousness, encourage the highest standards of scholastic achievement, and foster a greater sense of unity among its members; and

Whereas, These women believed that sorority elitism and socializing overshadowed the real mission for progressive organizations and failed to address fully the societal mores, ills, prejudices, and poverty affecting humanity in general and the black community in particular; and

Whereas, Since its inception, Zeta has continued its steady climb into the national and international spotlight with programs designed to demonstrate concern for the human condition. Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated is honored to have formed many wonderful community-based partnerships over the past 103 years. Community service programs called Z-HOPE (Zetas Helping Other People Excel) include the National Educational Foundation, the Elder Care Initiative, Stork痴 Nest, March of Dimes, Adopt-A-School, St. Jude Children痴 Research Hospital, Micha痴 Voice, International Women of Color, Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Women Veterans Rock, and Zeta Sings the Blues; and

Whereas, The organization has been innovative in that it has chronicled a number of firsts. It was the first National Pan-Hellenic Council organization to centralize its operations in a national headquarters, first to charter a chapter in Africa, first to form auxiliary groups, and first to be constitutionally bound to a fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.; and

Whereas, The sorority takes pride in its continued participation in transforming communities through volunteer services from members and its auxiliaries. Zeta Phi Beta has chartered hundreds of chapters worldwide and has a membership of over 100,000; and

Whereas, Sorority members from Michigan have contributed to the deep centennial history of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated. In 1941, the Omega Alpha Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, was established at Wayne State University in Detroit. In 1943, Soror Mary Watson Stewart of Detroit became the Central Regional Director for Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated; and

Whereas, In 1947, the sorority痴 regions were reorganized and renamed. The Great Lakes Region was created and Michigan was included; and

Whereas, In 1958, Founder Myrtle Tyler Faithful was present as her daughter, Frances Faithful, became a charter member of Zeta Beta Zeta Chapter in Flint, Michigan; and

Whereas, Soror Ione Hartley Gibson of Beta Omicron Zeta Chapter of Detroit, served as Associate Director for the Great Lakes region from 1955 to 1960. Soror Frances Faithful of Zeta Beta Zeta of Flint served as the next Associate Director from 1960 to 1962. Both were appointed by Great Lakes Regional Director, Soror Margaret Irby; and

Whereas, The official Michigan State Organization for the sorority was born under the leadership of Soror Ione Hartley Gibson as State Director. It was Soror Ione Hartley Gibson who initiated the first State Meeting in 1967, with four chapters, Beta Omicron Zeta, Zeta Beta Zeta, Zeta Nu Zeta, and Zeta Omega Zeta; and

Whereas, The Michigan State Organization of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, under the leadership of State Director Lynese Thomas, continues to provide Scholarship, Service, Sisterhood, and Finer Womanhood to the great state of Michigan, as an integral part of the Great Lakes Region with eighteen Graduate Chapters, thirteen Undergraduate Chapters, seven Amicae Auxiliaries and 10 Youth Affiliates (Archonettes, Amicettes, and Pearlettes); and

Whereas, The Michigan State Organization of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, is committed to preserving the historical summer resort cottage in Idlewild, Michigan, called Birch Haven. In 1937, Soror Violette Neatley Anderson, the first African-American woman to practice law in the state of Illinois, the first African-American woman to be admitted to practice before for the Supreme Court of the United States and the eighth Grand Basileus of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, bequeathed the Michigan cottage to the sorority; and

Whereas, In September 2005, Ione Hartley Gibson who served as the Great Lakes Regional Director from 1962 to 1969 was honored with a room dedicated to her memory at Birch Haven. Soror Gibson served Zeta Phi Beta Sorority in multiple capacities, including resident agent to Birch Haven; and

Whereas, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. has entered the 103rd year of its Finer legacy, it retains its original zest for excellence, never tiring in their efforts as a community-conscious, action-oriented organization dedicated to transforming the lives of others. Zeta represents diverse careers ranging from businesswomen, elected officials, educators, doctors, nurses, military, and attorneys. The sisterhood is strong and cannot be broken. In the 添ear of the International Woman Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. is poised to 摘mbrace The Swell by providing service, world-wide wellness, extraordinary leadership and legacy at home and abroad; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body honor the one hundred and third anniversary of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, and declare January 16, 2023, as Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, Founders Day in the state of Michigan; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to Dr. Stacie N.C. Grant, 26th International President & CEO of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, to Keisha Smith, the Great Lakes Regional Director for Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, and to Lynese Thomas, Director, Michigan State Organization, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, at the national headquarters for Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Rep. Aiyash moved that Rules 69 and 71 be suspended and the resolution be considered at this time.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members serving voting therefor.

 

 

Point of Order

 

 

Rep. Posthumus requested a ruling of the Chair on how many members it takes to suspend the rules.

The Chair ruled it takes 3/5 of the members elected and serving.

 

Rep. Posthumus moved to reconsider the vote by which the House suspended the rules.

The question being on the motion made by Rep. Posthumus,

Rep. Posthumus demanded the yeas and nays.

The demand was not supported.

The question being on the motion made by Rep. Posthumus,

The motion did not prevail, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

 

Rep. Aiyash offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 19.

A resolution to amend the Standing Rules of the House of Representatives.

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That Rules 33, 34, 36, 38, and 41 of the Standing Rules of the House of Representatives are hereby amended to read as follows:

 

Names and Number of Members.

Rule 33. (1) All standing committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, except where the House shall otherwise order.

(2) The standing committees of the House and the number of Members shall be as follows:

(a) Agriculture (13)

(b) Appropriations (30 29)

(c) Criminal Justice (13)

(d) Economic Development and Small Business (13)

(e) Education (13 14)

(f) Elections (8)

(g) Energy, Communications, and Technology (17)

(h) Ethics and Oversight (9)

(h) Families, Children and Seniors (10)

(i) Government Operations (5)

(k) Health Policy (19)

(l) Higher Education (14)

(l m) Insurance and Financial Services (17)

(m n) Judiciary (13)

(n o) Labor (10)

(n p) Local Government and Municipal Finance (13)

(o q) Military, Veterans and Homeland Security (10)

(p r) Natural Resources, Environmental, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation (9)

(r s) Regulatory Reform (15)

(t) Tax Policy (12)

(u) Transportation, Mobility and Infrastructure (13)

(3) Statutory Standing Committees:

(a) Joint Committee on Administrative Rules (5)

(b) House Fiscal Agency Governing Committee (6)

(c) Legislative Council (6)

(4) The House Journal shall report the roll call on all motions to report bills, resolutions and reorganization orders. (See Const 1963, Art 4 ァ 17)

(5) Committees shall adopt a meeting schedule at the commencement of each term which shall be printed in the House Journal. Additional meetings may be called by the Chair or by a majority of the Members in writing to the Clerk. The Chair may cancel any scheduled meeting, except one called by a majority of the Members, by notice to the Members.

 

Uniform Committee Rules.

Rule 34. (1) The Clerk of the House shall assign committee clerks with the approval of the respective committee Chairs. Duties of committee clerks shall be prescribed by the Clerk.

(2) Special committees shall operate under the same rules as standing committees insofar as practical. Conference committees on House bills shall meet at a place assigned by the Clerk.

(3) All committees will operate under the following rules:

(a) A quorum of a committee shall consist of a majority of the Members appointed and serving;

(b) Members of standing committees may not check in for a committee meeting and leave their vote. Members of committees may only cast a vote if they are present at the meeting during the vote;

(c) Members of standing committees may utilize Remote Participation in accordance with subsection (14) for purposes of committee deliberation;

(d) It shall require an affirmative vote of a majority of the Members appointed to and serving on a committee in order to:

(i) Report a bill or resolution out of committee

(ii) Recommend an amendment to a bill or resolution

(iii) Reconsider a vote to report a bill or resolution from committee

(e) Provided a quorum of a committee is present, it shall require an affirmative vote of a majority of the Members voting in order to:

(i) Table a bill or resolution

(ii) Take a bill or resolution from the table

(iii) Reconsider a vote, other than in subdivision (d)(iii)

(f) It shall require an affirmative vote of a majority of the Members voting in order to postpone action on a bill or resolution;

(g) The Chair of a standing committee shall determine the agenda for a committee meeting; and

(h) The Chair of a standing committee, in consultation with the Speaker, may create subcommittees and shall designate what is to be considered by each subcommittee. The Chair of the standing committee shall designate a Chair of the subcommittee and shall appoint Members to each subcommittee.

(4) The Speaker may designate additional Members to serve on any subcommittee of a standing committee as voting members who do not serve on the full committee.

(5) Subcommittees shall follow the same rules as standing committees.

(6) Meetings or public hearings of committees may be scheduled outside of Lansing with prior written approval of the Speaker. Subcommittees must have the prior written approval of the Chair of the standing committee and the Speaker in order to conduct a public hearing or meeting outside of Lansing.

(7) All meetings or public hearings of committees or subcommittees shall comply with the following procedures in order to assure public access (See Const 1963, Art 4 ァァ 16 and 17):

(a) All meetings or public hearings shall be open to the public and accessible;

(b) The right of any person to attend a meeting or public hearing includes the right to tape-record, videotape, and/or broadcast live;

(c) The right of any person to attend a meeting or public hearing may not be conditioned on prior approval of, or notice to, the committee or subcommittee;

(d) All decisions of a committee or subcommittee shall be made at a public meeting;

(e) The right of a person to attend a meeting or public hearing shall not be limited by a requirement that she or he register or otherwise provide her or his name or other identifying information;

(f) A person shall not be excluded from a meeting or public hearing of a committee or subcommittee except for a breach of the peace or in order to protect the health and safety of persons in attendance at the meeting;

(g) A conference committee shall give a 6-hour notice. A second conference committee shall give a 1-hour notice. Notice of a conference committee meeting shall include written notice to each member of the conference committee and the Majority and Minority Leaders of each house indicating the time and place of the meeting; (See Act 267 of 1976, MCL 15.265)

(h) A rescheduled or a special meeting of a committee or subcommittee shall be posted at least 18 hours before the scheduled meeting time. No committee, subcommittee, or conference committee shall remain in session or stand in recess beyond the hour of 12:00 midnight; and

(i) Notice of committee or subcommittee meetings or public hearings shall include notice that individuals needing special services to fully participate in the meeting or public hearing may contact the committee or subcommittee Chair to request the necessary assistance.

(8) Each committee shall have written minutes prepared of each meeting. The minutes shall include the date, time, place, Members present, Members absent, Members excused, and any decisions which were made. The minutes shall also include all roll call votes taken at the meeting. The proposed minutes of a meeting shall be available for inspection by the public within 8 working days of the meeting. Minutes shall be approved by the committee at the next meeting. Approved minutes shall be available for public inspection no later than 5 working days after approval.

(9) Committees may excuse a Member from attending a committee meeting.

(10) Committees shall not meet after a session of the House has been called to order without the consent of the House.

(11) To the extent practical, special committees shall follow the same rules as standing committees of the House.

(12) With approval of a majority of the Members appointed and serving on the committee, a committee may adopt additional rules provided they do not conflict with the Uniform Standing Committee Rules or with the Standing Rules of the House.

(13) A motion for previous question is not in order.

(14) 燃emote Participation under this rule means simultaneous, interactive participation in a committee meeting or public hearing by electronic means for purposes of questioning and testimony. All of the following apply if Remote Participation is used:

(a) Members that are participating remotely shall be considered present for the purpose of a quorum;

(b) Members that are participating remotely may not vote on any bill, resolution, motion, or proceeding before the committee;

(c) The electronic means for participating remotely shall be established and administered by the committee clerk but must include live, two-way communication to allow members to hear and interact throughout the committee meeting or public hearing; and

(d) The committee Chair and committee clerk must be physically present for all committee meetings and public hearings.

Committee and Auditor General Reports.

Rule 36. Upon receipt of Auditor General reports, the Ethics and Oversight Committee shall review the reports and, if appropriate, refer the reports to the appropriate standing committee for consideration. Consideration by the standing committee shall not impede or preclude any Member from initiating any action in response to an Auditor General report.

Reports of Committees.

Rule 38. (1) A committee may recommend amendments, a substitute, or referral to another committee, with or without recommendation as to passage or adoption. A substitute is an amendment that replaces all of the language in a bill or resolution.

(2) Substitutes reported by the committee shall include all adopted amendments and shall be prepared by the Legislative Service Bureau. A majority of the Members serving on a committee shall be necessary to report a bill or resolution out of the committee. A majority of the Members appointed to a committee and serving shall constitute a quorum. Minority reports shall not be permitted or received by the House. Bills or resolutions reported without recommendation as to passage or adoption shall lie on the table.

(3) All bills favorably reported back to the House shall be referred to second reading together with amendments recommended by the standing committee. All resolutions reported back to the House shall be referred to reports of standing committees together with amendments recommended by the standing committee. If more than one standing committee has considered a bill, only the amendments recommended by the last committee to consider the bill shall be considered.

(4) Except as provided in subsection (6), a bill creating or revising a criminal offense or a bill with a recommended amendment that creates or revises a criminal offense may only be favorably reported back to the House by the Judiciary Committee.

(5) Except as provided in subsection (6), a bill containing an appropriation or a bill with a recommended amendment that contains an appropriation may only be favorably reported back to the House by the Appropriations Committee.

(6) The following committees may favorably report any bill back to the House:

(a) Appropriations;

(b) Judiciary;

(c) Government Operations;

(d) Rules and Competitiveness;

(e) Any special or select committee.

 

Introduction.

Rule 41. (1) All bills to be introduced shall be approved as to form and numbering of sections by the Legislative Service Bureau and be signed by the Member introducing them. Ten Four copies of each shall be delivered to the office of the Clerk by the sponsoring or co-sponsoring Member not later than three hours prior to calling the House to order, unless permitted by a simple majority vote of those voting. If the sponsoring or co-sponsoring Member is unable to deliver the ten four copies to the office of the Clerk due to a family or medical exigency, then the leader of that Member痴 caucus may deliver the copies on his or her behalf. The Clerk shall number bills in the order of receiving, and present the same to the House at the next session of the House. All bills shall be introduced in printed form.

(2) Once a bill has been turned in to the Clerk痴 office for introduction, up to three hours prior to calling the House to order, a Member may add his or her signature as a co-sponsor only with the permission of the sponsor.

(3) No person may add or remove any signature, other than his or her own, from a bill being introduced.

(4) The Speaker shall refer all bills and joint resolutions to a standing committee no later than one House legislative day after being submitted to the Clerk.

(5) The Speaker may change the original referral of a bill or resolution by written communication submitted to the Clerk before the end of session on the next House legislative day following the day of the original referral. Notice of the referral shall be announced by the Clerk and printed in the Journal.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Aiyash moved that House Committees be given leave to meet during the balance of today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Announcement by the Clerk of Printing and Enrollment

 

 

The Clerk announced that the following bills and joint resolution had been reproduced and made available electronically on Tuesday, January 17:

House Bill No. 4018

Senate Bill Nos. 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Senate Joint Resolution A

 

The Clerk announced that the following Senate bills had been received on Wednesday, January 18:

Senate Bill Nos. 7 8

Messages from the Senate

 

 

Senate Bill No. 7, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies and the legislative branch for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2023; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

The Senate has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 8, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled 典he state school aid act of 1979, by amending sections 11, 22b, 31f, 39a, 51a, 51c, 53a, 54, and 147c (MCL 388.1611, 388.1622b, 388.1631f, 388.1639a, 388.1651a, 388.1651c, 388.1653a, 388.1654, and 388.1747c), sections 11 and 51a as amended by 2022 PA 212 and sections 22b, 31f, 39a, 51c, 53a, 54, and 147c as amended by 2022 PA 144.

The Senate has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

Introduction of Bills

 

 

Rep. Filler introduced

House Bill No. 4019, entitled

A bill to amend 1939 PA 288, entitled 撤robate code of 1939, (MCL 710.21 to 712B.41) by adding section 21a to chapter XIIA.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Criminal Justice.

 

 

Rep. Shannon introduced

House Bill No. 4020, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, by amending section 1280f (MCL 380.1280f), as added by 2016 PA 306.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Education.

 

 

Rep. VanderWall introduced

House Bill No. 4021, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled 哲atural resources and environmental protection act, by amending sections 81101, 81132, 81145, 81146, and 81150 (MCL 324.81101, 324.81132, 324.81145, 324.81146, and 324.81150), section 81101 as amended by 2020 PA 385 and sections 81132, 81145, 81146, and 81150 as added by 1995 PA 58.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

 

 

Rep. VanderWall introduced

House Bill No. 4022, entitled

A bill to amend 1998 PA 58, entitled 溺ichigan liquor control code of 1998, (MCL 436.1101 to 436.2303) by adding section 1016.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Rep. VanderWall introduced

House Bill No. 4023, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled 哲atural resources and environmental protection act, by amending section 21102a (MCL 324.21102a), as added by 2022 PA 160, and by adding section 21102b.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, Environment, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation.

Rep. Zorn introduced

House Bill No. 4024, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled 典he Michigan penal code, by amending section 317a (MCL 750.317a), as added by 2005 PA 167.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Criminal Justice.

 

 

Rep. Zorn introduced

House Bill No. 4025, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, (MCL 760.1 to 777.69) by adding section 5a to chapter II.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Criminal Justice.

 

 

Rep. Zorn introduced

House Bill No. 4026, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 639, entitled 滴ertel-Law-T. Stopczynski port authority act, by amending sections 2, 4, 8, 9, 14, and 22 (MCL 120.102, 120.104, 120.108, 120.109, 120.114, and 120.122), section 14 as amended by 2002 PA 412.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Tax Policy.

 

 

Rep. Zorn introduced

House Bill No. 4027, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, (MCL 380.1 to 380.1852) by adding section 1138a.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Education.

 

 

Rep. Zorn introduced

House Bill No. 4028, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending section 722 (MCL 257.722), as amended by 2018 PA 274.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Transportation, Mobility and Infrastructure.

 

 

Reps. Arbit, Tsernoglou, Byrnes, Conlin, Snyder, Mentzer, Rheingans, Grant, MacDonell, Morgan, Price, Hood, Skaggs, Rogers, Stone, Wegela, Brabec, Hoskins, Wilson, Puri, Young, Neeley, O誰eal, Farhat and Aiyash introduced

House Bill No. 4029, entitled

A bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled 溺ichigan election law, by amending section 613a (MCL 168.613a), as amended by 2015 PA 1.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Elections.

 

 

Reps. Rogers, Roth, Neeley, Tsernoglou, Fitzgerald, Wegela, Haadsma, Price, Hood, Rheingans, Dievendorf, Edwards, Andrews, McKinney, Coleman, Scott, Martus, MacDonell, Arbit, Tyrone Carter, Glanville, Snyder, Grant, Brixie, Brabec, Skaggs, Conlin, Weiss, Stone, Farhat, Young, O誰eal, Miller, McFall, Puri and Whitsett introduced

House Bill No. 4030, entitled

A bill to amend 2000 PA 92, entitled 擢ood law, by amending section 6101 (MCL 289.6101), as amended by 2012 PA 178.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Brabec, Pohutsky and Young introduced

House Bill No. 4031, entitled

A bill to amend 1953 PA 232, entitled 鼎orrections code of 1953, by amending section 33b (MCL 791.233b), as amended by 2019 PA 16.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

Reps. Young, Pohutsky and Brabec introduced

House Bill No. 4032, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, by amending section 16a of chapter XVII (MCL 777.16a), as amended by 2010 PA 97.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

 

 

Announcements by the Clerk

 

 

The Clerk received the following dissent on House Resolution No. 1, from Rep. Carra:

 

Wednesday, January 11, was the beginning of the 102nd State Legislature for the state of Michigan and was highlighted by a variety of typical political games that have continued to leave the common man in the dust. As many of you know, the Michigan Freedom Caucus, which I chair, issued a press release stating that the Freedom Caucus leadership team was calling for 渡o votes on the passage of the House Rules. The House Rules are the guidelines for how the House of Representatives is to be run and grants powers to the Speaker of the House on how to conduct business. We, as a legislative body, were expected to vote 土es with little to no time at all to review.

Typically for a legislative session, our offices receive an agenda that details what we will be voting on, allowing Legislators some time to read through the legislation and express any concerns.

Here痴 a timeline of events from January 11, 2023.

I arrived in Lansing at 8:25 am, having heard zero specifics from leadership of either chamber regarding what would and would not be proposed in the House Rules. Given that the proposed rules are historically bad as they hand over too much power to the Speaker of the House, I sought to make the following motion:

鄭ll House Members shall be recognized as serving at the pleasure of their respectful districts, not at the pleasure of the Speaker of the House. The Speaker, or a designee thereof, shall not take adverse or discriminatory action against a House member, including but not limited to the hiring and firing of a member痴 legislative staff, their office allotment, and parking privileges.

I notified the Clerk at 9:20 am with a signed physical copy that I planned to make the above motion.

We did not receive a copy of the proposed House Rules until 9:42 am, 22 minutes later and the same day of voting, meaning legislators were not properly prepared to vote and most simply did what they were told.

From 10 am until after 11 am, the Republican members caucused, leaving very little time before session to work on any changes with session starting at noon.

Around 1 pm and on the House floor, I was providing a revised copy to the clerks and preparing to make the motion. As I made my way toward a podium to make the motion, Representative Schriver stood up to make a separate motion to delay the vote, which was made in order prior to my motion. Yet, he was not recognized by Clerk Brown or Speaker Tate. Refusing to even recognize a member is a tactic historically used by leadership on both sides of the aisle stifling legislative authority of members who are not in leadership.

Although today was a minor setback, it serves as another example of how the establishment operates and how the clerks allow leadership to run over members who don稚 conform to their go-along-to-get-along style of government. I applaud the Republicans who took a stand with me against this heinous process, and I will continue to fight for the principles our Founding Fathers intended us to have.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Witwer moved that the House adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 3:00 p.m.

 

The Speaker Pro Tempore declared the House adjourned until Thursday, January 19, at 12:00 Noon.

 

 

RICHARD J. BROWN

Clerk of the House of Representatives